'Matt Lee' on Serious Eats

Shrimp and Grits from 'The Lee Bros. Charleston Kitchen'

A seamless union of land and sea, shrimp and grits just may be the perfect example of lowcountry cuisine. Briny shrimp tossed in butter, cream, or tomato-y gravy are a graceful foil to sweet, earthy grits. The dish itself has been around at least since the early 20th century and as such has spawned many variations. Some are totally bare-bones, containing only shrimp, butter, and grits, while others include bacon, tomatoes, and spice. Matt and Ted Lee's version in The Lee Bros. Charleston Kitchen is more akin the latter. More

Shrimp and Grits from 'The Lee Bros. Charleston Kitchen'

A seamless union of land and sea, shrimp and grits just may be the perfect example of lowcountry cuisine. Briny shrimp tossed in butter, cream, or tomato-y gravy are a graceful foil to sweet, earthy grits. The dish itself has been around at least since the early 20th century and as such has spawned many variations. Some are totally bare-bones, containing only shrimp, butter, and grits, while others include bacon, tomatoes, and spice. Matt and Ted Lee's version in The Lee Bros. Charleston Kitchen is more akin the latter. More

Matt's Four-Pepper Collards from 'The Lee Bros. Charleston Kitchen'

The four-pepper collards in Matt and Ted Lee's new cookbook, The Lee Bros. Charleston Kitchen, was inspired by the peppery taste of the plant's budding tips. A plethora of greens are stewed with a piquant mix of red jalapeño, poblano, smoked paprika, and a generous grind of pepper. Cooked for the better part of an hour, the greens develop a supple, tender texture with a pleasant undercurrent of heat. More

Henry's Cheese Spread from 'The Lee Bros. Charleston Kitchen'

The ingredient list for Matt and Ted Lee's cheese spread reads almost like a 2nd grader's cafeteria prank. Cheese, ketchup, worcestershire, horseradish, Tabasco, and beer—how could that taste good? Yet this recipe, from their new cookbook The Lee Bros. Charleston Kitchen, is one of those magical recipes that just works. The balance of tart, spicy, sweet, and malty is totally on point, making for a dip so multilayered that it's impossible to stop eating. More

Henry's Cheese Spread from 'The Lee Bros. Charleston Kitchen'

The ingredient list for Matt and Ted Lee's cheese spread reads almost like a 2nd grader's cafeteria prank. Cheese, ketchup, worcestershire, horseradish, Tabasco, and beer—how could that taste good? Yet this recipe, from their new cookbook The Lee Bros. Charleston Kitchen, is one of those magical recipes that just works. The balance of tart, spicy, sweet, and malty is totally on point, making for a dip so multilayered that it's impossible to stop eating. More

Cook the Book: 'The Lee Bros. Charleston Kitchen'

As a cook with strong South Carolina heritage, I was immediately drawn to Matt and Ted Lee's new cookbook, The Lee Bros. Charleston Kitchen. Their book, much like the cuisine that it covers, has an elegant simplicity and a definitive sense of place. When reading their recipes, I could almost hear my grand-relatives speaking to me in their long, soft Southern drawl; it transported me back to hot summertime family reunions on James Island. More

Cook the Book: 'Simple Fresh Southern'

Growing up in Charleston, South Carolina, left Matt and Ted Lee with a passion for Southern food that refused to be tamed. They have been spreading the gospel of Southern cooking since 1994, the year they started The Lee Bros. Boiled Peanuts Catalogue, a mail order source for foods that are hard to find above the Mason-Dixon Line. With the success of the catalog came offers from magazines for the brothers to write about the subject that was so near and dear to them, Matt and Ted Lee quickly became the go-to guys for all things related to Southern foodways. The next logical step was a cookbook, and The Lee Bros. Southern Cookbook was born. This comprehensive book of classic... More

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