'Lunar New Year' on Serious Eats

Mushrooms and Tofu With Mustard Greens is a Vegetarian Must-Have for Your Chinese New Year

Every year, families celebrate the Chinese Lunar New Year with an impressive feast called Reunion Dinner, and among the many plates on the table is abalone in a rich sauce with dried oysters, shiitakes, and an algae called black moss. Inspired by that dish, this recipe is a vegetarian take with easier-to-find ingredients, like tofu and both fresh and dried mushrooms. Even without the seafood it still delivers on the richness and flavor of the original. More

Why My Fridge Is Never Without Shirataki Noodles (and Yours Shouldn't be Either)

I'm on a mission to convince you to make shirataki noodles a pantry staple. That's right, I'm talking about those slippery yam-starch noodles packed in water-filled bags that boast their calorie- and gluten-free properties. But I want to be clear: I don't give a damn about their supposed health properties. Honestly, I think they're delicious. Let me explain. More

Serious Entertaining: A Chinese New Year Feast

I love a good food-centric holiday, so while I'm not Chinese, Vietnamese, or Korean you can bet I'll be cooking up a storm when the Lunar New Year rolls around next Friday, January 31. And if you or your family are from one of those countries, chances are you, too, will be gathering with friends and relatives to feast and spread goodwill for the year to come. We've pulled together some of our favorite symbolic dishes commonly enjoyed during the Chinese New Year. More

8 Recipes for Lunar New Year

This Thursday is Lunar New Year, which, if you're Chinese, Vietnamese, Korean, or just a festive person, means you'll probably be eating with friends and family. Lunar New Year doesn't have specific holiday foods, per se. Feasting with loved ones is the most important part! Here are recipes for rice cakes, dumplings, mochi, scallion pancakes, and more. More

Scooped: Persimmon and Honey Ice Cream

Jewish and Chinese holidays, despite some obvious differences, actually have many important features in common. Nothing puts a Jew at ease like a holiday characterized by ancient traditions, delicious foods that represent those traditions, and the widespread exchange of cash. As good Jews, Max and I decided this week to honor Chinese New Years with an ice cream recipe that pays homage to the tradition of using gold-colored ingredients for a rich year. Golden persimmons, golden honey, golden yolks, a touch of golden ginger; you get the picture. More

Banh Chung for Lunar New Year

In areas with a sizable Vietnamese community, you can find banh chung around Lunar New Year. Stacked in neat bricks, sometimes even warm, the sign of a good banh chung is one that's meaty, hefty, and tightly rolled. Here's a recipe and how-to. More

The Year of the Pickle, and Other Jewish Food Astrology

jewzo.com We've already started celebrating the incoming Year of the Ox, but what would astrological signs be like if they were assigned Jewish deli foods instead? Luckily Jewzo, a company devoted to this made-up Jewish Zodiac, came along and answered our prayers. Year of the Pickle includes 1937, 1949, 1961, 1973, 1985, 1997, and 2009. "You’re the perfect sidekick: friends love your salty wit and snappy banter but you never overshadow them. That shows genuine seasoning from when you were a cucumber. Marry a Pastrami later in life." No offense ox, but Year of the Lox also sounds like a party. [via Save The Deli]... More

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