'Kentucky' on Serious Eats

Serious Entertaining: Kentucky Derby Party

I can't claim to be from Kentucky or any state south of the Mason-Dixon (southern California doesn't count right?) but I've been to a few Derby parties in my day. I've worn a few wide-brimmed hats. So let's waste no time and start with mint juleps, then move on to beer cheese, Kentucky Hot Browns, bourbon balls, and more for your Race Day spread. More

Video: Cooperative Urban Farm in Louisville

The ideas of cooperative work are central to many movements in Latin America. Nelson Escobar brought these ideas from his home in El Salvador to Louisville, Kentucky, where he coordinates a large urban farm that brings together a diverse community to grow, eat, and sell good food. Watch this video to see the inspiring story. More

Serious Entertaining: Kentucky Derby Party

I can't claim to be from Kentucky or any state south of the Mason-Dixon (southern California doesn't count right?) but I've been to a few Derby parties in my day. I've worn a few wide-brimmed hats. So let's waste no time and start with mint juleps, then move on to beer cheese, Kentucky Hot Browns, bourbon balls, and more for your Race Day spread. More

Video: Herding Backyard Goats in Louisville, Kentucky

It's not often that you look at a suburban backyard to find a man herding goats, but that is what people in one neighborhood in Louisville experience every day. Burundian refugee Jean-Marie herds goats within the Louisville, Kentucky, city limits. He sells them to the growing immigrant and refugee population. Goat isn't yet popular with all Southerners, but it reminds Jean-Marie of his homeland. This video captures the day we spent with him and his family. More

Kentucky Hot Brown

The Hot Brown is ostensibly an open-faced sandwich—it starts with a piece of toasted bread (the original recipe calls for Texas Toast) and gets topped with sliced roasted turkey. But from there it leaps directly into Hangover Helper territory when a precisely measured volume (known as a morethanyoucouldreasonablyhopetoneed) of cheesy, creamy Mornay sauce is poured over the top and the whole thing is placed under the broiler to bake until bubbly. More

Lexington, KY: Exceptional Doughnuts from Spalding's

"The first time I read about Spalding's Doughnuts, all I could think was these sound remarkably like Georgie's," Ed told me. Georgie's was a personal favorite of Ed's—a Harlem doughnut shop that's been closed for about a decade now. Irregularly shaped, airy, full of stretchy nooks and crannies and an unusually thick, crisp crust, these are the kind of doughnuts that are the aesthetic opposite of the perfectly round factory-stamped shape of the major chains. More

BraveTart: Peanut Butter Jelly Time

One of my favorite parts of snuggling up to the latest issue of any given food magazine is catching up on restaurant news in cities across America. New York. Boston. San Francisco. Chicago. Lexington. "Wait, Lexington...What state is that even in?" I can hear you asking. More

KFC vs Lee's: Finding the Real Kentucky Fried Chicken

Growing up there were two fried chicken places in my hometown: Lee's Famous Recipe (known over the years as Famous Recipe and later just Lee's) and KFC (formerly Kentucky Fried Chicken). KFC was Coca Cola while Lee's was RC Cola in that KFC had way better marketing and national distribution. But I decided it was finally time to go beyond my childhood biases and superficial rankings and take a true Kentucky fried chicken challenge. More

United States of Pizza: Kentucky

The Bluegrass State may be better known for the Colonel's fried chicken, but it has plenty of good pizza to offer. Louisville has a number of celebrated pizzerias, but some of the best pies can be found at restaurants that don't specialize in pizza. Outside of Louisville, you can find VPN-certified pies as well as a pizzeria that caters mostly to rock-climbers. More

Hot Dog of the Week: Alligator Coney, Northern Kentucky

The standard Cincinnati Coney is about four inches, only slightly bigger than the Troy NY Mini-Dogs but smaller than a Southern ten-pound hot dog, and covered with heavily spiced Cincinnati Chili. The Alligator ($1.59) starts with the same small pink hot dog, but it's covered in a massive pile of shredded neon yellow cheese, and instead of chili, a crisp pickle spear and plenty of mayonnaise. Sound weird? It was great. More

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