'How-to' on Serious Eats

Freeze Fresh Herbs for Long-Term Storage

There's no herb storage method I know of that can faithfully retain the flavor and texture of completely fresh herbs, but if you find yourself with more than you can possibly use, there are some methods that will work better than others. So you want to have something that closely resembles fresh herbs for sauces, soups, and stews? In that case, the freezer is your friend. Here's the best way to freeze herbs for long-term storage. More

How to Make the Ultimate Poutine

A perfect poutine is a trifecta of the best of its three ingredients—fries with a crisp exterior and soft interior, fresh and soft squeaky cheese curds, and a beefy brown gravy that's just flavorful enough without overwhelming the fries or curds. Getting each piece of the puzzle together for an ultimate version like this takes some time, but once complete, the reward is so good you'll go gaga even if you're totally sober. More

How to Make Stir-Fried Beef With Chinese Broccoli

Beef with broccoli is a staple of North American Chinese fast food joints, but the real version of this dish uses Chinese broccoli (gai lan), not the more familiar broccoli florets. Gai lan pairs perfectly with the strips of marinated beef, shallots, garlic, and oyster sauce in this easy dish. More

How to Make Light and Tender Potato Gnocchi

Considering how fundamentally simple they are, potato gnocchi sure do make people nervous. Do it right, and they're light and tender. Do it wrong, and they're gummy little bricks. Here we delve into every major aspect of gnocchi making and explain how each can impact the result. But first take a deep breath, because this doesn't need to be stressful. It can actually be a lot of fun, and an excellent exercise in honing your abilities as a cook. More

Use the Microwave to Dry Your Herbs for Long-Lasting Intense Flavor

Like oysters and princes, herbs are nearly always at their best when they're fresh. But we've all been there: you buy a bunch of parsley from the supermarket for those 2 tablespoons of garnish that you need, a week goes by, and you suddenly find yourself with a whole lot of fresh parsley that's on its way out. What do you do? Compared to other drying methods—like hanging or using a low oven—the microwave produces the most potent dried herbs with the freshest flavor and the brightest color. Here's how to do it. More

How to Make Roman Semolina Gnocchi (Gnocchi alla Romana)

Long before ships brought native crops from the Americas to Europe, Italy was a land without red sauce, corn polenta, or potato gnocchi. But even without the potato, gnocchi still existed, such as in the form of the classic gnocchi alla Romana, this custardy oven-baked version made with semolina, egg, cheese, and butter. You could say these are the OG: the original gnocchi. More

The Best and Most Accurate Way to Measure Wet and Dry Ingredients for Baking

Proper measuring is a crucial part of successful baking. Unlike cooking, where you can often get away with eyeballing, baking is chemistry and requires precision. Add too much flour to cake batter and the cake may come out tough and dry. Not enough flour and you risk ending up with a badly structured cake that will collapse in the oven. Enter: Measuring 101. Today we're going to talk about the best tools for measuring, how to measure wet versus dry ingredients, why an ounce is not always an ounce, and why you should really, really consider investing in a good digital scale. More

How to Make Microwave Popcorn in a Brown Paper Bag

I don't make much popcorn at home: I don't own a dedicated popcorn popper, and the sound of the metal pan scratching on the burner as I shake it back and forth is enough to drive me crazy. The solution lies in a brown paper lunch bag and the microwave. Here's how to make the easiest popcorn ever. More

How to Brown Butter

Brown butter is one of those shortcut ingredients to great cooking, adding nutty, toasted flavors to whatever it touches. And all it takes to make is some butter, a pan, and a spatula. Here's how. More

How to Trim a Whole Beef Tenderloin for Roasting

Beef tenderloin is the most expensive cut of meat on the steer. At a good butcher or supermarket, a trimmed center-cut tenderloin can run you as much as $25 to $30 per pound! But there are ways to minimize that cost. The best way is to buy the tenderloin whole and untrimmed, bring it home, and trim it yourself. More

How to Tie a Butcher's Knot

A butcher's knot has one big advantage over a regular square knot: it's a slip knot, which means that once you tie it, you can adjust it very easily without needing an extra finger to hold the knot in place as you tighten it. More

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