'Gruyere' on Serious Eats

Shauna James Ahern's Zucchini Noodles with Spinach Pesto, Feta, and Sunflower Seeds

While many may scoff at the idea of replacing carbo-goodness with healthy raw veggies, I find thinly sliced vegetables to be a fine vehicle for pasta sauce, especially one as vibrant and flavorful as Ahern's spinach pesto. It is brilliantly green from the spinach and has a robust blend of Gruyère, feta, and lemon juice: perfect for tossing with zucchini. More

Shauna James Ahern's Zucchini Noodles with Spinach Pesto, Feta, and Sunflower Seeds

It was with trepidation that I approached the pasta chapter of Shauna James Ahern's new cookbook Gluten-Free Girl Every Day. Most of the pasta recipes in the book call for store-bought pasta. (She does include one recipe for gluten-free fresh pasta, but doesn't provide an assembled recipe using it.) While I'm sure that gluten-free pasta options have improved significantly since that fateful quinoa noodle disaster, I wasn't sure I wanted to mess up dinner with a poor grocery store choice. Instead, I turned to this recipe for zucchini "noodles." While many may scoff at the idea of replacing carbo-goodness with healthy raw veggies, I find thinly sliced vegetables to be a fine vehicle for pasta sauce, especially one as vibrant and flavorful as Ahern's spinach pesto. More

Vegetarian: Provençal Tomatoes

Provençal tomatoes couldn't be simpler to make: cut tomatoes in half, scoop out their innards, and fill them with a quick but flavor-packed stuffing made of fresh bread crumbs, grated Gruyere cheese, garlic and fresh or dried herbs. Drizzled with a little olive oil, they bake in the oven until the stuffing soaks up those wonderful tomato juices, becoming soft and tender, yet brown and crusty on top. More

Provençal Tomatoes (Baked Tomatoes Stuffed with Cheese and Breadcrumbs)

Provençal tomatoes couldn't be simpler to make: cut tomatoes in half, scoop out their innards, and fill them with a quick but flavor-packed stuffing made of fresh bread crumbs, grated Gruyere cheese, garlic and fresh or dried herbs. Drizzled with a little olive oil, they bake in the oven until the stuffing soaks up those wonderful tomato juices, becoming soft and tender, yet brown and crusty on top. More

Easy Kale Quiche

[Photographs: J. Kenji Lopez-Alt] About the author: J. Kenji Lopez-Alt is the Chief Creative Officer of Serious Eats where he likes to explore the science of home cooking in his weekly column The Food Lab. You can follow him at... More

French in a Flash: Endive Gratins

Endive gratin is a traditional dish—it has the rich voluptuousness of a gratin and crisp, bitter verdure of the vegetable. Ham-wrapped endive halves are smothered in a simple béchamel and covered with Gruyère cheese, then baked until the endive is soft and mellow and the cheese is bubbly and gooey. Add a small green salad with a little lemon juice and fleur de sel and you're in business. More

Dinner Tonight: Sweet Potato and Gruyère Turnovers

I am not a baker. I almost always screw something up, leaving my kitchen disheveled and covered in a sticky coating of flour. But while these may not be the prettiest turnovers to ever emerge from an oven, even I have to admit that they were remarkably easy to construct. What else should expect from Real Simple magazine? Just purchase some premade frozen pie crusts, top with a filling, fold them over, and then pop these in the oven and in 25 minutes or so. That's dinner. More

Dinner Tonight: Monte Cristo

To me this sounds like the worst kind of dish: a mishmash of dinner, breakfast, and chaos, all on the same plate. Essentially it's a ham sandwich that's been cooked like French toast. And you're even supposed to eat it with strawberry jam! So why does it come out tasting balanced? I blame the mustard, which really should never be paired with powdered sugar, but somehow keeps everything in order. More

Can 'Pushing Daisies' Increase Awareness of Pie With Cheese?

Photo from GirlieErin on Flickr The second season of Pushing Daisies is back on ABC this Wednesday, and as a pie enthusiast, I believe this can only be good for the world. The show is about a guy with magical death-reversing powers, but more importantly, it's about pie. Ned is a pie-maker at "The Pie Hole," where, last season, he whipped up an apple pie with Gruyère baked into the crust to cheer up his girlfriend's cheese-loving spinster aunts. (He also laced anti-depressants into the batter, but that's another story). The apple pie with cheese theory has roots in England, where it developed the nickname "Yorkshire pie." At first slightly gross-sounding, the concept grows on you. The marriage between... More

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