'Germany' on Serious Eats

A Beginner's Guide to German Wine

Overwhelmed by German wine labels? Not sure how to figure out if a wine is going to be sweet or dry? We can help. Consider this your friendly introduction to the grapes, regions, and many reasons to love German wine. More

Beers You Should Know And Drink: Gose

What sets this style apart from a witbier are the adjuncts. Coriander and salt are added during (or after) the boil in order to create a fuller mouthfeel and added complexity. (This tradition may have arisen from salty springs that provided early brewers their water.) Typically brewed below 5.0% ABV, these session beers are ideal to crack open on a warm spring day. More

Snapshots from Germany's Wine Country: Mosel, Nahe, and Rheinhessen

It is one thing to drink wine at home, to open bottles at a dinner party, to remark on how delicious something is. It is one thing to read the long, hard-to-pronounce words on a label as you sip, and find a picture of that place online or in a book. It is another thing entirely to stand on that hard-to-pronounce hill and feel the wind pulling at your hair, feel the loose red rocks slipping under your sneakers. More

11 Delicious German Rieslings to Drink with Dinner Tonight

When people ask me about why riesling seems so trendy right now, my first answer is that it's delicious, and my second answer is that it's delicious with food. There isn't heavy oak or heavy alcohol to stand in the way of a happy match, and the wine tends to have a delicious herbal and mineral character that makes it a particularly fantastic partner for seafood. Want to try for yourself? What's for dinner tonight? More

Bottom Shelf Beer Olympics: Germany

Next Tuesday is my birthday, and for the first time in several decades I care slightly more about the occasion than the rest of you do. It's entirely possible that I wrote a big "Hey, it's my birthday!" post last year, but if so I assure you I was faking it, because last year my birthday was a Sunday. No one needs an excuse to drink outside on a summer Sunday afternoon, and a dozen sunshine beers is plenty parade enough for any well-adjusted partially grown man. More

10 Food Souvenirs from Germany

When you think of German food, certain things tend to come to mind. Cabbage, potatoes, sauerkraut, schnitzel, potatoes, bread, pickles. But these things don't tend to travel well. Luckily, Germany is home to a whole host of other foods that can make the journey home just fine. And people will thank you. More

Snapshots from Germany: 10 Cheap Eats in Berlin

Berlin isn't the first city that comes to mind when thinking of Europe's rich culinary traditions. But hidden behind the thousands of döner shops is a hearty, affordable food scene, drawing from Berlin's multikulti landscape. Here are 10 cheap eats—currywurst, schnitzel, falafel, and more. More

Riesling Report: Willi Schaefer Graacher Himmelreich Kabinett 2008

Riesling nerds tend to sigh when you mention Willi Schaefer; the tiny production, the beautiful flavors, the few bottles they've sequestered away in long-term storage. There's an elegance and polish to this wine that you don't see at lower price levels, but the excitement is still there. A fennel and elderflower note reminded us a bit of pastis, with blue-green, mentholated eucalyptus-like flavor as it opens up. More

Oktoberfest: More Than a Wedding Party

Munich's Oktoberfest began not as a beer festival, but with a royal wedding—on October 12, 1810, Crown Prince Ludwig I of Bavaria married Therese of Saxe-Hildburghausen, and Bavaria rejoiced. Everyone in Munich was invited by the Bavarian National Guard to enjoy the five-day party. The field in which most events were held became known as Theresienwiese, in honor of the princess. In fact, it was so much fun (and remuneratively rewarding for Munich's city fathers) that it was decided to celebrate the royal couple's anniversary each year in similar style. More

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