'French' on Serious Eats

Classic Cherry Clafoutis

With its fancy French name and beautiful appearance when fresh from the oven, a classic cherry clafoutis is bound to impress guests. Little do they know just how easy it is to make—just whip up a simple batter with egg, milk, sugar, and flour, then pour it onto some cherries and bake. More

The Food Lab: How to Make Foolproof Béarnaise Sauce

For my money, the very best classic steak sauce you can make at home, a sauce that will wow your guests with its flavor and elegance, and—most importantly—a sauce that can be made start to finish in under half an hour, is béarnaise. The catch (there's always a catch) is that made with the classic technique, it's very easy to mess up. Here is a foolproof technique that uses hot butter and a hand blender for perfect results every time. More

Foolproof Béarnaise Sauce

For my money, the very best classic steak sauce you can make at home, a sauce that will wow your guests with its flavor and elegance, and—most importantly—a sauce that can be made start to finish in under half an hour, is béarnaise. The catch (there's always a catch) is that made with the classic technique, it's very easy to mess up. Here is a foolproof technique that uses hot butter and a hand blender for perfect results every time. More

Roasted Chicken With Classic or Curry Soubise (Onion Sauce)

Soubise, an old-school French sauce classically made by pureeing softened onions with bechamel, is a great pairing for all sorts of roasted meats, like the roast chicken here. In this more modern version, it's simplified and lightened by using cream in place of the bechamel, then flavored with curry powder or vadouvan, a French variation on curry powder with garlic and shallots. More

The Art of Tarte Flambée: Alsatian Pizza With Fromage Blanc, Bacon, and Onions

It looks like a pizza, it cooks like a pizza, but don't make the mistake of actually thinking it's a pizza. Tarte flambée, the Alsatian flatbread topped with fromage blanc (a fresh, tart, spreadable cheese), thinly sliced raw onions and bacon, is as Franco-Germanic in flavor as can be. Here we look at two ways to make it: the classic way on bread or pizza dough rolled very thinly, and the bar-style pizza way, on a flour tortilla cooked in a cast iron skillet. Both are so good we can't decide which way we like best. More

Bar-Style Tarte Flambée (Alsatian Pizza With Fresh Cheese, Onions, and Bacon)

It looks like a pizza, it cooks like a pizza, but don't make the mistake of actually thinking it's a pizza. Tarte flambée, the Alsatian flatbread topped with fromage blanc (a fresh, tart, spreadable cheese), thinly sliced raw onions and bacon, is as Franco-Germanic in flavor as can be. This method delivers a bar-style tart, cooked on a flour tortilla in a cast iron skillet, then browned under the broiler. It has a thin, cracker-like crust that is irresistible. More

Classic Tarte Flambée (Alsatian Pizza With Fresh Cheese, Onions, and Bacon)

It looks like a pizza, it cooks like a pizza, but don't make the mistake of actually thinking it's a pizza. Tarte flambée, the Alsatian flatbread topped with fromage blanc (a fresh, tart, spreadable cheese), thinly sliced raw onions and bacon, is as Franco-Germanic in flavor as can be. This method delivers a classic tart, made on pizza dough rolled very thinly and cooked on a blazing hot Baking Steel or pizza stone right under the broiler. More

French Melt (Grilled Cheese With Caramelized Onion and Comté)

Want to impress your dinner date? Whip up a couple of French Melts. That's a big ol' pile of sweet, caramelized onions (see here for an easy technique to speed up the process) melted with a fat slab of Comté cheese. It's like French onion soup in an easy-to-pick-up, extra-buttery package. Set the table cloth and pull out the fine china, dear, tonight I'm wearing pants to the table! More

The Secret to Great Coq au Vin? Lose the Coq

The problem with a lot of coq au vin recipes is that they continue to use a method devised for tough rooster meat, even though most of us today cook with tender roasting hens. Here's what you need to know to get tender, juicy, and flavorful coq au vin that tastes like it spent a long time in the oven, even though it didn't. More

Coq au Vin (Chicken Braised in Red Wine)

A lot of coq au vin recipes have you braise the bird for hours. That's fine when you're doing it the traditional way with a tough old rooster, but it doesn't work well for the tender roasting hens most of us use today. This recipe delivers a rich and deeply braise with red wine, mushrooms, lardons, and onions that tastes like it was in the oven all day, except that it wasn't. More

Mussels with Fennel-Saffron Broth

I've gone on record as saying that mussels are the easiest choose-your-own-adventure one-pot meal around, and I intend to prove it to you. This version uses my standard steamed mussel technique and combines it with the classic flavors of a French bouillabaisse. Fennel, saffron, and tomatoes are cooked together with a little pastis and orange zest to form an aromatic, briny broth for dipping bread into. More

The Food Lab: How to Cook Mussels (The Easiest Choose-Your-Own-Adventure One Pot Meal Around)

I don't know why mussels don't get more love. They're always inexpensive (even at Whole Foods they run under $5 a pound!), they're delicious, they're elegant (heck, you might even call 'em downright fancy!), and best of all, they're ridiculously quick and easy to cook. Got a bag of mussels, a bit of butter, a few aromatics, and a bottle of wine on hand? Great. Dinner's on the table in just about 15 minutes. Today we're gonna go with the basics and fire up a pot of super-traditional French-style moules marinières—sailor-style mussels which hail from the coast of Normandy. More

How to Make Traditional Cassoulet (And Why You Should Put Chicken in It!)

The first time I had cassoulet in its home turf it was a revelation. This loose, almost soup-like stew of beans and meat was so far removed from all versions of cassoulet I'd had in the United States, or even in other parts of France. It was a large, bubbling vat of beans and meat, covered in a crust so dark that it was almost black. Rich, meaty, and overwhelmingly simple, the main flavor was just that of the cured meat, a good stock, and beans. Here's how to make it at home. More

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