'Foie Gras' on Serious Eats

From the Archives: Beef Wellington

There's no doubt that Beef Wellington is delicious. How can it not be? The exterior is a light, crisp, buttery crust, glazed a deep, shiny golden brown, twinkling with crystals of sea salt. You slice through it to reveal layers of the finest ingredients in the Western world: slivers of prosciutto, a duxelles of wild mushrooms bound with cream, and foie gras, all encasing a core of medium-rare, buttery-soft beef tenderloin. And for all that, it's actually a surprisingly simple roast to do right. Check out our recap, and prepare your guests to be dazzled. More

Video: Making Ethical Foie Gras in Spain

Everyone has an opinion about foie gras. Whether you think it is animal cruelty or the most delicious ingredient on the planet, this film will challenge your perspective. Eduardo de Sousa's family has been raising Geese for foie gras for over 200 years, and they do it without force feeding, by following the birds' natural cycle. It's pretty incredible (and delicious). Watch our latest video from Spain to learn more. More

The Food Lab: How To Make a Foie Gras Torchon (Secret Technique Inside!)

A perfect foie torchon melts on the tongue like the creamiest butter, but with a distinct cured sweetness that forms the perfect balance for a perfumed wine. It's simple to serve—just slice it, put it on a piece of toast, add a bit of dried fruit or preserves, and go—and let's face it, it'll impress your guests. It's the ultimate in hors d'oeuvres, using not just one of the finest ingredients money can buy, but also showcasing your kitchen skills. More

So This Exists: Foie Gras Corn Dog at Urbana in D.C.

Could this be one of the most clever interpretations of foie gras around? They start with housemade foie gras sausages made with a mixture of chicken breast, foie gras, and pork fat back, added to a lamb casing. The sausages get dunked in a corn dog batter (made with white cornmeal, flour, baking powder, soda and buttermilk) and deep-fried. The finished dogs with a cornichon relish, housemade cognac mustard, and espelette pepper. More

Wendy's Relaunches in Japan with Foie Gras-topped Burger

After leaving the Japanese market in 2009, Wendy's reopened in Japan yesterday with its first location in Omotesando, an upscale shopping district in Tokyo, and has plans to eventually open 700 locations in Japan, reports Businessweek. With the grand opening comes a new line of Japan Premium items, most prominently a foie gras-topped burger called the Foie Gras Rossini for ¥1280 (about $16.50). More

McFoie Burger from Tapaç24 in Barcelona

McDonald's condiment options don't include foie gras mayo (big shocker) but at Tapaç24, the small plates hotspot in Barcelona, they pay homage to the fast-food chain in the form of this little burger. The beef patty comes medium-rare, almost tartare-rare in the very center, on a thin, crisp bun. Nothing else on the burger, just that little black dish of creamy foie on the side waiting to be spooned up. As my Kindergarten teacher Ms. Wookey said, a little dab will do ya (in that context she was referring to Elmer's glue). More

The Physiology of Foie: Why Foie Gras is Not Unethical

Video or photographic footage of one badly managed farm or even a thousand badly managed farms does not prove that the production of foie gras, as a practice, is necessarily harmful to the health or mental well-being of a duck. Foie gras production should be judged not by the worst farms, but by the best, because those are the ones that I'm going to choose to buy my foie from if at all. More

The Nasty Bits: Foie Gras Butter

Enter, foie gras butter. It's exactly what it sounds like: a mixture of foie and butter, subtly spiced with salt, pepper, and whatever else you decide to use as flavoring. It is, obviously, fattier than foie because you manipulate the substance and jack it up with more fat. More

Peanut Butter: Good Foie Gras Replacement on New Year's?

Note: Lee Zalben, a.k.a. "the Peanut Butter Guy" is the creator of the Peanut Butter & Co., a New York sandwich shop with a national line of nut butters. Every week he chimes in with some nuttiness. Take it away, Lee! [Photograph: Lee Zalben] Champagne and foie gras—perhaps this is how you rang in the New Year during the stock market's boom times. But for 2010, you might not have the ducats to put on such a rich spread. And even if you can, perhaps you're opting for a less showy celebration. So if you aren't going to splurge on Krug or Veuve Clicquot, why not opt for some California sparkling wine or some affordable Spanish cava? And if you've... More

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