'Coffee' on Serious Eats

What's the Best Way to Brew Iced Coffee?

When it comes to opinions on iced-coffee brewing methods, passions can run high. A panel of Serious Eats tasters heads to Counter Culture Coffee for a blind tasting, putting the most popular method to the test. Based on our experience, the answer is clear. More

What You Taste When You Taste Sumatran Coffee

Why is Sumatran coffee so contentious? Coffees in Sumatra are traditionally processed using a method called Giling Basah, or wet-hulling, which results in a coffee that leaves the farm with a much higher moisture content than other methods used more popularly worldwide. Coffee processed this way tend to be described as herbaceous, spicy, wild, mushroomy, funky, earthy, and other things that may or may not sound good to you. More

Want to Open a Coffee Shop? Consider These 3 Tips First

12 years after opening my first coffee shop, I'm opening another—my sixth. I've learned a lot about opening and running coffee shops, some through making major mistakes. There's the obvious stuff (manage your cashflow, pay your taxes, etc.), the almost-as-obvious stuff (use good quality coffee, hire good people), and the stuff that nobody tells you about but may make the difference between running decent cafĂ© and a really great one. Today we'll focus on that last category of advice. More

How Japanese-Style Slow-Drip Coffee Brewers Work

Japanese slow-drip cold coffee brewers make a concentrate of patiently wrought coffee one drip at a time. These handsome towers use the variable of lots of time, not lots of temperature, to extract a brew that's more subtle and aromatic than cold brew methods that require steeping grounds completely in water. More

Anthora Pilsner

In Italy, an espresso is often served with a lemon twist. Leo Robitschek of Eleven Madison Park in Manhattan evokes that classic, combining lemon with coffee in a drink that adds bittersweet amaro and caraway-scented aquavit. More

Architects and Kings

Bartender Josh Relkin developed this recipe for Sable Kitchen & Bar in Chicago. It plays on the bitter side of coffee, adding herbal amaro and spicy bitters. Topped with whipped cream, it's a great way to wind down after dinner. More

Petit Cafe

H. Joseph Ehrmann of Elixir in San Francisco created this cocktail for the 2006 Chartreuse Cocktail Competition, marrying the sweet, herbal notes of Green Chartreuse with coffee liqueur and a little cream. More

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