'Chinese' on Serious Eats

The Baijiu Riddle: Learning to Love China's Infamous Firewater

I first drank baijiu when I was 12, at a banquet in Beijing during a family trip to China. I took a small sip and felt the liquor flame down my throat, setting my nasal passages and eyes on fire. The aftertaste was of hot trash. My body involuntarily tensed as if I'd just drank poison. How was it that this drink, so deeply woven into my parent's warmest memories and the Chinese collective unconscious, tasted foremost of kerosene and rot? More

Grill Your Scallion Pancakes

With a brand new backyard and a brand new grill, I've been grilling pretty much all day every day. So it was only natural that when I decided to whip up a batch of scallion pancakes, my thoughts immediately turned to how I could incorporate the grill. Turns out it's as simple as it sounds: scallion pancake dough grills up as marvelously as it fries, getting crisp, bubbly, and nicely charred. Here's how to do it. More

Bang Bang Chicken, Hold the Bangin': The Modern Way to Make Sichuan Chicken Salad

True bang bang ji si gets its name from the sound that a mallet makes when beating the tough chicken breasts of yesteryear into tender submission before dressing them in a sauce flavored with Sichuan peppercorns, garlic, sesame seed, Chinkiang vinegar, and roasted chili oil. But with today's tender chickens, the actually banging part of bang bang chicken is nothing more than a relic of the past. Let's bring this dish into the modern age, shall we? More

Hot and Numbing Sichuan Chicken Salad (Bang Bang Ji Si)

Whether you call it Bang Bang Chicken (named after the sound that a pounding mallet makes when tenderizing the tough chicken breasts of yesteryear) or Mysterious Flavor Chicken, this classic cold Sichuan chicken salad dressed with Sichuan peppercorns, garlic, sesame, and chili oil, can be updated using a few modern techniques. Cooking the chicken breasts directly in a bag with aromatics guarantees ultra-moist and flavor-packed chicken without the need for any banging at all. More

20 Great Ways to Use Sichuan Peppercorns

The warm spice and citrusy aroma of Sichuan peppercorns can be totally addictive. The dark berry-hued peppercorns produce a tingly numbing sensation that wakes up your tongue; combined with fiery chilies, it's an effect known as ma la, or "numbing heat." From classics like dry-fried green beans and mapo tofu to amped-up chicken wings and burgers, we've got 20 great ways to make the most of the unique spice. More

Pretzel Bao With Sweet Sesame-Hot Mustard Pork

German-Chinese fusion may sound strange, but when pillowy pretzel buns meet bao, and mustard-slathered roasted pork meats char siu, it works. Chinese hot mustard, sesame paste, and honey make a flavor-packed change-up from the traditional char siu sauce, while a special Chinese bread-making trick makes the pretzel buns even more moist and tender. It's impossible not to love this Deutsch version of a Dim Sum classic. More

Essential Shanghai Street Food: 14 Must-Eat Dishes

Shanghai is a magnificent, pulsing magnet for migrants from all over China, and that diversity has made it the country's street food epicenter. Let's just say it's enough to overwhelm the senses, albeit in the best possible way. These are 14 of the city's most popular, not-to-be-missed dishes, from local specialties to dishes born elsewhere in China but no less beloved by the city's locals. More

Spicy Cumin Lamb Skewers (Yang Rou Chuan)

Travel around the world and you'll find a different kind of skewered, fire-roasted meat wherever you go. On the streets of Beijing, you'll spot these spicy lamb skewers coated in cumin and chili flakes. But there's no need to go to China just to have them—you can make them right in your own yard on the grill. Here's how. More

From the Archives: For the Best Stir-Fry, Fire Up the Grill

Stir-frying may seem simple—just heat up a wok, toss in your ingredients, stir until cooked, and serve. But looks can be deceiving, and your average homemade stir-fry will rarely have that characteristic smoky, complex flavor you'll get at a good Chinese restaurant. It's called wok hei—literally, breath of the wok—and you can only get it from extreme heat. Here are the best ways to replicate it at home. More

Curried Singapore Noodles: Probably Not From Singapore, Still Delicious

It's not entirely clear where Singapore noodles—the stir-fried curried rice noodles with shrimp, pork, and vegetables—come from, though it's unlikely Singapore is the source. Regardless, they're a stir-fry classic, and are easy to make at home. Here's what you need to know, from how to choose the right rice noodles to how to make the stir-fry work on a home burner. More

Singapore Noodles

It's not entirely clear where Singapore noodles—the stir-fried curried rice noodles with shrimp, pork, and vegetables—come from, though it's unlikely Singapore is the source. Regardless, they're a stir-fry classic, and are easy to make at home. Here's what you need to know, from how to choose the right rice noodles to how to make the stir-fry work on a home burner. More

Brooklyn's Great Unsung Chinatown: A Food Tour of Avenue U

There are more Chinatowns than meet the eye in New York. In Brooklyn, Sunset Park gets all the attention, but locals know of another Chinatown farther south, a stretch of Avenue U from Coney Island Avenue to Ocean Avenue, that's been home to a growing Chinese community for the past 15 years. There you'll find higher quality cooking than what most of Manhattan's Chinatown restaurants are serving these days. More

More Posts