Seriously Asian

Asian cookery, with an emphasis on the traditional, underappreciated, or misunderstood elements thereof.

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Taiwan Eats: Pan-Fried Rice Noodles

Seriously Asian Cathy Erway 2 comments

Perfect for feeding a crowd or fixing a solo meal on the fly, this simple home-style Taiwanese noodle-and-vegetable dish may look bland, but hidden within are layers of flavor, thanks to plenty of white pepper, black vinegar, and broth. More

Taiwan Eats: Three Cup Chicken (San Bei Ji)

Seriously Asian Cathy Erway 6 comments

Cooked in soy sauce, rice wine, and sesame oil, and loaded with heaps of whole garlic cloves, slices of ginger, and fresh Thai basil, this classic Taiwanese chicken dish is a perfect reminder of just how good an over-abundance of flavor can be. More

Taiwanese Three Cup Chicken (San Bei Ji)

Serious Eats Cathy Erway 15 comments

Cooked in soy sauce, rice wine, and sesame oil, and loaded with heaps of whole garlic cloves, slices of ginger, and fresh Thai basil, this classic Taiwanese chicken dish is a perfect reminder of just how good an over-abundance of flavor can be. More

Taiwan Eats: Braised Cabbage With Dried Shrimp, Chilies, and Shiitake Mushrooms

Seriously Asian Cathy Erway 3 comments

Soupier than the average sauté, this braised vegetable side course is great for pooling atop plain rice, lending subtle flavor to the entire bowl. More

Taiwan Eats: Hakka-Style Stir-Fry with Pork Belly and Squid

Seriously Asian Cathy Erway 1 comment

Salty, rich, and often employing cured and preserved ingredients, Hakka food won't leave you wanting for flavor. More

Taiwan Eats: An Expat's Thanksgiving Turkey Comes Served Over Rice

Seriously Asian Cathy Erway Post a comment

Call it turkey over rice, or just "turkey rice," as its name directly translates; either way, should you find yourself in Taiwan's southwestern county of Chiayi, this is the number one dish to try. The soulful, rustic meal has earned island-wide yearnings for its delicate balance of fragrant seasonings. Head over to the recipe to transport your classic Thanksgiving meal (or its leftovers) to an entirely different place. More

Taiwan Eats: Oyster Omelet

Seriously Asian Cathy Erway 1 comment

Partially translucent from a sticky and somewhat mysterious goo binding fried egg and bits of oyster, and slick with a sweet-and-sour ketchup-based sauce, the Taiwanese oyster omelet is a memorable dish that has a fervent following. More

My Thai: Stir-Fried Clams with Thai Chili Jam and Basil

Seriously Asian Leela Punyaratabandhu Post a comment

The juice released from the clams when combined with the smoky Nam Prik Pao becomes a delicious sauce that's greater than its individual components. With fresh Thai basil perfuming the whole thing, it's no wonder this dish is one of the most popular dishes at made-to-order food stalls. More

My Thai: Creamy Tom Yam Kung

Seriously Asian Leela Punyaratabandhu 18 comments

I'm convinced that Tom Yam should be one of the first, if not the first, recipes you start with when learning to cook Thai. In addition to being ridiculously easy to make, it's a dish that captures the essence of Thai flavors. More

Seriously Asian: Cold Somen Noodles

Seriously Asian Chichi Wang 8 comments

Here in the last throes of summer, lunch is sometimes no more than a mound of somen noodles served atop a bed of ice. Somen noodles are thin wheat noodles, as thin as vermicelli, more delicate than buckwheat. Twirled around chopsticks and dipped in a sauce made with soy sauce and dashi, the noodles slide down the throat. They are icy, firm, and rich. More

Cold Somen Noodles with Dipping Sauce

Serious Eats Chichi Wang Post a comment

Here in the last throes of summer, lunch is sometimes no more than a mound of somen noodles served atop a bed of ice. Somen noodles are thin wheat noodles, as thin as vermicelli, more delicate than buckwheat. Twirled around chopsticks and dipped in a sauce made with soy sauce and dashi, the noodles slide down the throat. They are icy, firm, and rich. More

Seriously Asian: Grilled Rice

Seriously Asian Chichi Wang 10 comments

This week's recipe is inspired by a segment on The Splendid Table, which I follow not only for the food but to hear Lynn Rosetto Kasper salivate on air. (Am I the only one?) Hearing people talk about food almost always makes me hungrier than watching videos or looking at photos, and this time she was talking about onigiri. More

Yaki Onigiri

Serious Eats Chichi Wang 10 comments

Most onigiri is not grilled. Sticky, short-grain rice compressed around fillings of fish, pickled vegetables or umeboshi (pickled plums) is the norm. A common home-style treat, onigiri is also sold in Japanese convenience stores and grocery stores where sheets of nori (seaweed) wrappers are covered in plastic to remain crispy. More

Seriously Asian: Durian Smoothie

Seriously Asian Chichi Wang 10 comments

It's that time of year again. My annual plug for durian, the oft-maligned, odoriferous fruit beloved in Southeast Asia and beyond. Usually, my advice to durian novices is to select a fruit with the least-pungent smelling odor you can find since different kinds of durian will range from mildly cheesy-smelling to gym-locker-stench-evoking. Durian smoothies are a treat on a hot summer's day. You might even get a few durian converts if you serve the fruit in smoothie form, which offers a milder kick of that distinctive cheesy taste. More

Durian Smoothie

Serious Eats Chichi Wang Post a comment

It's that time of year again. My annual plug for durian, the oft-maligned, odoriferous fruit beloved in Southeast Asia and beyond. Usually, my advice to durian novices is to select a fruit with the least-pungent smelling odor you can find since different kinds of durian will range from mildly cheesy-smelling to gym-locker-stench-evoking. Durian smoothies are a treat on a hot summer's day. You might even get a few durian converts if you serve the fruit in smoothie form, which offers a milder kick of that distinctive cheesy taste. More

Seriously Asian: Perilla Leaves

Seriously Asian Chichi Wang 13 comments

If you live in an area with a big Asian community then you've probably seen little old Asian ladies hawking produce on the side of the road. They stand out in the hot sun selling produce at very cheap prices, and they are there day after day. Right now the Korean ladies are selling stacks of perilla leaves, though if you go to any Korean grocery store, you'll see them being sold as sesame leaves. I don't understand why they refer to perilla leaves as sesame leaves, but they do. More

Marinated Perilla Leaves

Serious Eats Chichi Wang 3 comments

If you live in an area with a big Asian community then you've probably seen little old Asian ladies hawking produce on the side of the road. They stand out in the hot sun selling produce at very cheap prices, and they are there day after day. Right now the Korean ladies are selling stacks of perilla leaves, though if you go to any Korean grocery store, you'll see them being sold as sesame leaves. I don't understand why they refer to perilla leaves as sesame leaves, but they do. More

Seriously Asian: Preserved Duck Egg

Seriously Asian Chichi Wang 17 comments

I seem to be on a roll in this column with talking about oft-maligned, malodorous foods common in Asian cuisine. Natto, for instance, being the most noxious of them all. Preserved duck egg is another one. It's not for everyone, but of course that's what makes it so special. More

Boiled Greens with Preserved Duck Eggs

Serious Eats Chichi Wang Post a comment

I seem to be on a roll in this column with talking about oft-maligned, malodorous foods common in Asian cuisine. Natto, for instance, being the most noxious of them all. Preserved duck egg is another one. It's not for everyone, but of course that's what makes it so special. More

Seriously Asian: Salted Duck Egg

Seriously Asian Chichi Wang 10 comments

Like curing meats, the practice of salting duck eggs may have started as a method of preservation, but now salted duck eggs are a delicacy. Salting makes the egg whites dense and almost rubber-eraser-like in appearance, but it's the yolks that are especially prized. There's nothing quite like a good salted duck egg yolk. If properly salted, the duck egg yolks are creamy, granular, and oily all at once—an intriguing textural composition that tastes especially rich and salty. More

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