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Cashew Chicken Ding With Jicama, Celery, and Red Bell Pepper

A ding dish is any Chinese stir-fry in which the chicken and vegetables are diced into little cubes, and crunchy ingredients like nuts are added for texture. Kung Pao Chicken is perhaps the best known example, but Cashew Chicken Ding isn't far behind. In this version, the chicken is stir-fried with mushrooms, jicama, celery, bell pepper, and cashews. More

Squid Ink Fresh Pasta

Aromatic squid ink is used to color this classic fresh egg pasta and give it a silky black hue. But while it may smell strong, the resulting noodles are relatively neutral in flavor. It's traditional to pair them with seafood, but they'll taste good with any sauce or added ingredients that play well with a subtle hint of brininess. More

San Antonio-Style Puffy Tacos With Ground Beef Filling

Puffy tacos, a San Antonio specialty, are made from fresh masa that puffs and crisps in hot oil. The shells end up crisp outside and soft within, and full of robust corn flavor. They can be stuffed with your favorite variety of taco-night fillings—this recipe uses a flavorful ground beef mixture that's earthy, spicy, and slightly smoky. More

Buddha's Delight (Lo Hon Jai): Chinese Vegetarian Stir-Fry

Tired of the same old vegetarian stir fry? Buddha's Delight is just what you need. A celebratory mixture of multiple vegetables and protein sources (wheat gluten, bean-curd skin, bean-curd puffs, and more), noodles, and a flavorful sauce infused with mushrooms, it's a reminder that vegetarian stir-fries don't have to be the same old ho-hum dish every time. More

Pork Chops With White Wine and Leek Pan Sauce

Creating a pan sauce that has body and richness doesn't just happen by mistake: You have to use certain techniques to get there. In this easy dinner, pork chops are served with a light, bright pan sauce made from leeks, white wine, chicken stock, and lemon zest. The leeks, though, add more than just flavor: they also fortify the sauce with bulk and texture, adding body and substance where there might not otherwise be any. More

Sichuan Roast Leg of Lamb With Celery-Mint Salad

Sichuan cuisine is famous for its stir-fried lamb, combining the hot and tingly flavors of Sichuan peppercorns and dried red chilies with plenty of cumin and other spices. So we asked ourselves, why not take those very same flavors and rub them all over a glorious roast leg of lamb? The results were phenomenal. More

Ricotta and Black Pepper Gnudi With Sage and Brown Butter

Normally I'm all about innovation and deep digging and hardcore testing here at The Food Lab. But this time I'm starting with a dish so iconic, so incredible, so damn-near-flawless in its original form that the best I can possibly hope to do is tweak it just a bit to suit my very particular personal tastes. I'm talking about the ricotta gnudi at The Spotted Pig, April Bloomfield's West Village gastropub. Thin, thin pasta surrounds a core of creamy, explosive sheep's milk ricotta all served in a brown butter and sage sauce. And the good news is that my favorite dish isn't even that hard to make. More

Chinese Sticky Rice Wrapped in Lotus Leaf (Lo Mai Gai)

Lo mai gai, the dim sum classic of steamed lotus leaves stuffed with sticky rice and all sorts of delicious goodies, are irresistible from the moment you unwrap one fresh from the steamer and a chorus of aromas hits your nose. The biggest task is gathering all the ingredients, like the lotus leaves and glutinous rice, as well as Chinese sausage, cured pork belly, and salted egg yolks. Once you've got them rounded up, though, it's a relatively easy and extremely delicious at-home dish. More

Stir-Fried Beef With Chinese Broccoli

Beef with broccoli is a staple of North American Chinese fast food joints, but the real version of this dish uses Chinese broccoli (gai lan), not the broccoli florets you might be more accustomed to. Gai lan is mildly bitter, with tender leafy sections and juicy stalks, and it pairs perfectly with the strips of marinated beef, shallots, garlic, and oyster sauce. More

Light and Tender Potato Gnocchi With Sage-Butter Sauce

We're not going to lie: Potato gnocchi can be a little tricky and require some practice to get right. But if you know a few basic rules, it's really not that hard to make ones that are light and tender, not leaden and gummy. This recipe walks you through those steps, starting with choosing a gnocchi-friendly potato and cooking it the right way; then we leave it up to you whether to add egg yolk or not (yolks make a dough that's easier to work with, but also firmer); and finally we add just enough flour to make a cohesive dough while being careful not to overwork it to the point of gumminess. The result are lovely little gnocchi in a sage-butter sauce that will prove that good gnocchi aren't out of reach. More

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