September 29, 2013 – October 5, 2013

Apple and Pear Hand Pies

Sometimes the best part of spending an afternoon making pie is having a slice cold for breakfast the next morning. But if you've having company over and don't want to serve pie for brunch, this simple handheld version takes a classic dessert and puts it in a brunch-friendly disguise. More

Pineapple Duck Curry From 'Everyday Thai Cooking'

This duck curry from Katie Chin's new cookbook, Everyday Thai Cooking, is perhaps one of her richest: the generous pour of coconut milk and fat-laced duck meat definitely take the dish into stick-to-your-ribs comfort territory. Still, the bright sweetness of the pineapple and tomatoes, combined with the abundant fresh herbs and spicy curry paste, lightens the dish just enough to make it enjoyable even on a sunny October day. More

Pumpkin Spice Ice Cream

This ice cream tastes like a better, more homemade version of a Starbucks pumpkin spice latte (minus the coffee, which is pretty incidental), thanks to a dose of vanilla bean, cinnamon, clove, nutmeg, and a wee nip of bourbon. More

Sazerac and Cider

The true apple flavor of hard cider is a natural partner for a warming spirit like rye and even plays well with the anise and botanicals in Pernod, which can be a bit of an oddball to mix. More

Granny's Navy Grog

Taking a cue from the tiki tradition, this version of a Navy Grog layers light, un-aged rum with a full-bodied, aged dark rum. Fresh squeezed grapefruit and lemon juice pull out the tart acidic notes of the Granny Smith Woodchuck Cider. More

Sweet Potato Brioche French Toast

There are a lot of steps involved in this recipe for sweet potato French toast with homemade sweet potato brioche, but none of them are hard, and if you've never made brioche be reassured that it's among the easiest of bread doughs. If you can make cake, you can make brioche! More

Spicy Thai Salad With Minced Pork (Larb) From 'Everyday Thai Cooking'

Katie Chin's larb in Everyday Thai Cooking is not a strictly authentic version. Instead of serving a meat-heavy plate with lettuce on the side, she tosses the (pre-ground) cooked pork with greens and a few extra vegetables. The authenticity police may cry foul. But just because the dish isn't totally authentic (and, let's be clear, the key items in a good larb—roasted rice powder, chiles, fish sauce, lime, and meat—are all there), doesn't make it an unsuccessful dish in any way. In fact, I ate the whole bowl over the course of the day, and enjoyed every single bite of it. More