April 28, 2013 – May 4, 2013

Springtime Frittata from 'Family Table'

A frittata is a wonderful way to make use of odds and ends in the kitchen. WIth so many spring vegetables springing these days, I had plenty of small bits to turn into dinner. Or lunch. Or brunch. The spring frittata in Michael Romano and Karen Stabiner's Family Table is presented as the perfect dish for serving at any time of day, and at any temperature. Indeed, the combination of wholesome veggies, rich eggs (with extra yolks), and nutty Gruyere cheese is killer at any time of day. And while the recipe reads long, it can easily be broken up into two phases: the filling, and the eggs. Saute the vegetables and roast the potato when you can, and then whisk and bake up the frittata right before serving. More

Charred Tomatillo and Yellow Pepper Salsa

Dried, toasted pasilla chilis are blended with tomatillos and yellow peppers, blistered under a broiler to create a smoky edge for the natural sweetness of the vegetables. Smooth and beautiful in color, this salsa will work great in fish tacos, on roasted or grilled corn, or mixed into rice and beans. More

Ancho-Chipotle Salsa with Chocolate and Fried Almonds

Combining cocoa, sweet ancho, spicy, smoky chipotle and toasty, fried almonds results in an earthy, slightly sweet flavor palette. This salsa is a bit on the thick side, which makes it perfect as a chip dip, or to slather onto tacos or quesadillas. I would probably even eat it on toast topped with a gooey fried egg. More

Grilled Bloody Mary Salsa

Grilling the tomatoes gives the salsa smoky char flavors, boosted by the deep, fermented flavor of the Worcestershire sauce. And like any respectable Bloody Mary, both are mixed with lemon, black pepper, and an excellent source of spice: fresh chile de arbol for a dash of Mexican authenticity. More

May Day Pie

In this traditional treat of the Kentucky Derby, chocolate and nuts are poured in a crisp pastry crust. A little bourbon helps things shine. More

Herb Ricotta Gnocchi With Quick Tomato Sauce

I call ricotta gnocchi "fast food" Italian, as with just a little practice, you can make ricotta gnocchi in as little time as it takes you to boil the water to cook them in. This really is a dish, sauce included, that can be prepared and cooked in under 30 minutes which makes it a fabulous choice for busy mid-week meals. More

Seared Short Rib Wraps from 'Family Table'

Today I'd like to present an argument in favor of lettuce wraps. Sure, they have a reputation for being a vehicle for ho-hum, low-carb and bland diet food, but there's no reason they need to stay in such a category. Once filled with rich and spicy short ribs, soft and sticky white rice, and potent kimchi as they are in Michael Romano and Karen Stabiner's Family Table, the humble Bibb lettuce leaf transforms into the best sort of wrap. They're strong enough to contain its filling, yet supple and mild enough to not overpower their contents. It's the best excuse to eat with your hands. These particular short rib wraps are super easy to throw together: blend up a potent marinade and let the boneless rib meat drink up its flavor for a couple of hours (or more if need be), heat a heavy pan, and sear away. More

Lamb Bolognese from 'Family Table'

We've written several recipes for bolognese sauce over the years here at Serious Eats, and these recipes usually fall in two camps: the traditional slow-cooked multiple-meat bolognese camp or the easier, lighter, faster meat-sauce-maybe-known-as-bolognese camp. This lamb bolognese from Michael Romano and Karen Stabiner's Family Table falls squarely in the middle. Instead of using the traditional shortcut of pre-ground beef (or a quartet of beef-veal-pork-chicken livers), this bolognese calls for simply ground lamb. This single step adds rich, slightly gamey flavor that would be impossible to achieve using any other single meat. More

Yellow Bell Pepper Panzanella from 'Family Table'

There's nothing like the first bite of a sweet-tart, chewy-crunchy, tomato-rich panzanella in the middle of the summer--except of course that moment when you realize that bread salads can be made sans tomato, all months of the year. After all, the beauty of panzanella is that you get to eat tons of bread and still call it a "healthy" salad, right? The Yellow Bell Pepper Panzanella in Michael Romano and Karen Stabiner's Family Table is a prime example of the form. Made mostly of caramelized onions and bell peppers, this panzanella has all of the vibrancy of the original without running the risk of eating a mealy tomato. Capers and a generous amount of torn basil are key to perking up the rich sweetness of the vegetables. More