September 23, 2012 – September 29, 2012

Max and Eli Sussman's S'mores with Maple-Bourbon Marshmallows

Throw some bourbon and maple syrup into homemade marshmallows as Max and Eli Sussman suggest in This is a Cookbook, and you've got an excellent adult-style treat. The brothers take their marshmallows one step further by incorporating them into a year-round take on s'mores (with ganache instead of Hershey's). These are no girl-scout dessert--they're boozy, sweet, and the sheer size of the marshmallows will gleefully turn even the most resolute health nut on the path to diabetes--but they're totally worth it. More

Max and Eli Sussman's Chilaquiles with Tomatillo Salsa

Any of the meals in the "Lazy Brunch" chapter would be excellent contenders for a home-cooked hangover helper, but perhaps the most appropriate is Max and Eli Sussman's recipe for five-minute Chilaquiles with Tomatillo Salsa. Simply a pile of chips smothered in warmed salsa, leftover chicken, eggs, and cheese, the dish isn't (I would say) true chilaquiles, but it certainly fills that greasy, rich void when the most you can handle in the morning is to fry an egg. More

Apple and Pear Tarte Tatin

This is the perfect tart for showcasing the colors and flavors of the fall season. The fruit caramelizes in a simple syrup of butter, sugar, and apple cider, making the apples and pears fork-tender over layers of flaky puff pastry. More

Ina Garten's Turkey, Sausage, and Prosciutto Meatballs

It's tough to go wrong with spaghetti and meatballs, but I'm always up for a variation. This recipe from Ina Garten eschews the common beef for turkey instead. But while that's usually a terrible idea (because the way to go wrong with meatballs is to make them tough and dry), she keeps them interesting (and juicy) by adding in Italian sausage and finely chopped prosciutto. More

Spam and Pineapple Spring Rolls with Homemade Sweet and Sour Sauce

If sliced just right, Spam makes for an excellent spring roll filling—especially so when combined with slivers of fresh pineapple, toasted sesame seeds, and green onions. When fried to a crisp in hot oil, these Hawaii-ified spring rolls are great as is, but a dip in homemade sweet and sour sauce provides another contrast to the crunchy shell and toasted sesame seeds, salty Spam and sweet pineapple. More

Max and Eli Sussman's Watermelon Gazpacho

While many tomato gazpachos could easily be mistaken for watery salsa, this watermelon version from This is a Cookbook is anything but. Max and Eli Sussman blend together freshly strained watermelon juice with a rich, thickening mixture of almonds, bread, onion, bell peppers, and olive oil to create a vibrantly red, totally slurp-able, tail end of summer appetizer. It's a little on the sweet side, sure, but that's easily fixable with a drizzle of hot sauce and squirt of lemon. More

Pig Parts Sugo

Sugo is usually made with guanciale, unsmoked pork jowl, but I wanted to see what would happen if I used any smoked pork, plus a fresh cut. The results were mighty good. The fresh cuts, especially the ones with skin, gave some nice body to the sauce. The smoked parts added depth. More

Max and Eli Sussman's Pork Chops with Apple Chutney

Anyone who thinks a pork chop is "a flavorless hunk of chewy meat" (as Max and Eli Sussman put it) have yet to try a double-cut chop prepared steakhouse-style. Seriously, the double-cut chop could change just about anyone's mind when it comes to leaner cuts of pork. The width of the chop and presence of the bone allows it to be cooked long enough to develop a crust while staying juicy and tender on the inside. In This is a Cookbook, the Sussman brothers add extra insurance by brining these extra-large chops overnight before searing them off while basting in herb butter. More

Traditional Beef Pho

There are few things better for the soul or the body than a tangle of slick rice noodles in a rich, crystal clear, intensely beefy broth; the warm aroma of cinnamon, cloves, and star anise rising up in a cloud of steam. The intensely savory-salty hint of fish sauce balanced by a squeeze of lime juice and a handful of fresh herbs and chilies that you add to your bowl as you eat. Here's how to make it at home. More

Doughnut Pies

Don't let the photo fool you: while these holey treats may resemble doughnuts, they're actually pies! They are made up of morsels of pie crust which are then filled, rolled up and pinched to ensure the filling stays inside, then fried. While they're certainly not health food, they certainly are delicious: crispy, not too-sweet, easy to make, and completely open to improvisation with flavor. More