September 2, 2012 – September 8, 2012

James Peterson's French-Style Vegetable Stew

This stew takes advantage of more than a few cooking techniques (blanching, boiling, steaming, glazing, and simmering); a good challenge for anyone wanting to test their skills. Each vegetable is precisely cut, cooked, and assembled to be as dramatic as possible. The method(s) works; the final stew is a celebration of vegetation. More

DIY Pastis

Pastis is an anise-flavored aperitif that's one of life's little luxuries, and you can make a richly flavored homemade version by steeping some spices and bark in a jar for just a few days. More

Raspberry Mousse Pie

This pie recipe calls for frozen raspberries, delivering the flavor of summer, anytime of year. Unlike many other mousse recipes that call for egg whites, this one relies on whipped cream stabilized with gelatin to give the mousse its lift. It's just sweet enough, and feels deliciously light on the tongue, perfectly complimented by the flaky, all-butter crust. More

James Peterson's Tomato and Herb Gratin

Hear the word gratin, and my mind often drifts towards rich, cheesy potato casseroles served up in the cold depths of winter. I was pleasantly surprised, then, to hear James Peterson wax poetic on a simple Tomato and Herb Gratin in his Vegetables. Made only with ripe summer tomatoes, parmesan cheese, olive oil, and herbs, the dish is the simplest (and lightest) in a long line of more recognizable baked tomato dishes like lasagna and eggplant parmesan. More

Red Onion Jam

Although it may look like a pile of caramelized onions, slowly reduced red wine and balsamic vinegar make this sweet, fruity, and tart onion jam so much more. More

Serious Rye Bread

I tend to make fluffy rye breads that are destined for sandwiches, but sometimes I really want a dense, chewy rye. This isn't sandwich bread; it's more a bread you'd slice thin with appetizers or toss in a bread basket. It's not a lightweight bread; it's more serious than that. More