Serious Eats: Recipes

Jeni Britton Bauer's Tuscan Sundae

[Photograph: Stacy Newgent]

The flavors here are so complementary and play off each other perfectly: the salt and caramelized sugar in the ice cream, the warm honey and Vin Santo sauce—delicious.

Note: Danger! The ice cream uses a dry-burn technique. I don't add water to the sugar before putting it on the heat, as some chefs do. Caramelizing sugar dry means it goes faster, but you have to watch it more closely and be ready with your cream. Here is an overview of what you are going to do:

Stand over the pan of sugar with a heatproof spatula ready, but do not touch the sugar until there is a full layer of melted and browning liquid sugar on the bottom with a smaller layer of unmelted white sugar on the top. When the edges of the melted sugar begin to darken, use the spatula to bring them into the center to help melt the unmelted sugar. Continue stirring and pushing the sugar around until it is all melted and evenly amber in color--like an old penny. When little bubbles begin to explode with dark smoke, give the sugar another moment and then remove from the heat. Immediately but slowly pour about 1/4 cup of the cream and corn syrup mixture into the burning-hot sugar. Be careful! It will pop and spit! Stir until it is incorporated, then add a bit more cream and stir, then continue until it is all in.

Excerpted from Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams at Home by Jeni Britton Bauer. (Artisan Books). Copyright © 2011.

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