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Condiments and Sauces

Pickled Rhubarb Stalks

Pickled Rhubarb Stalks

This pickled rhubarb is both sweet and tart. I like to cut the stalks into lengths that fit in the jar neatly and slice it into bite-sized pieces just before adding to a cheese plate or tossing into a grain salad.

About the author: Marisa McClellan is a food writer, canning teacher, and dedicated pickler who lives in Center City Philadelphia. Find more of her jams, pickles and preserves (all cooked up in her 80-square-foot kitchen) at her blog, Food in Jars. Her first book, also called Food in Jars, will be published by Running Press in May 2012.

Every recipe we publish is tested, tasted, and Serious Eats-approved by our staff. Never miss a recipe again by following @SeriousRecipes on Twitter!

Pickled Rhubarb Stalks

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About This Recipe

Yield:makes 2 pints
Active time:25 minutes
Total time:48 hours
Special equipment:mason jars, canning pot
This recipe appears in: In a Pickle: Pickled Rhubarb Stalks
Rated:

Ingredients

  • 1 pound rhubarb stalks (4 to 6 large stalks)
  • 1 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine grain salt
  • 2 teaspoons mustard seeds
  • 1/2 teaspoon black peppercorns
  • 1/2 teaspoon whole cloves
  • 2 star anise

Procedures

  1. 1

    Prepare two wide mouth pint jars and lids.

  2. 2

    Wash rhubarb stalks well and trim to fit into the jars. If the stalks are broad, slice them into lengthwise sections. In a small saucepan, combine the apple cider vinegar, water, sugar and salt and bring to a boil.

  3. 3

    Divide the mustard seeds, peppercorns, cloves and star anise between the two prepared jars. Pack the rhubarb pieces into the jars above the spices.

  4. 4

    Once the pickling liquid has boiled and the sugar and salt are dissolved, pour it into the jars over the rhubarb, leaving 1/2 inch headspace. Tap the jars gently to dislodge any air bubbles. If the headspace level has dropped significantly, add more pickling liquid.

  5. 5

    Wipe jar rims, apply lids and rings and process jars in a boiling water bath canner for 10 minutes. When time is up, remove jars from canner and set them to cool on a folded kitchen towel. When jars are cool enough to handle, remove rings and test seals. If jars are at all sticky, wash them to remove that residue. Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry for up to 1 year. Unsealed jars can be stored in the refrigerator and eaten within 2 weeks.

  6. 6

    Let this pickle cure for at least 48 hours before eating.

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