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Cocktail Concoctions

Time for a Drink: Chartreuse Swizzle

Time for a Drink: Chartreuse Swizzle

Let's start the weekend right--with a cocktail recipe from Paul Clarke of The Cocktail Chronicles. Need more than one? Hit up the archives. Cheers!

In a recent diatribe against oppressive summer heat, I praised the class of crushed ice drinks known as swizzles. Originating in the Caribbean and typically made of rum, lime juice, and occasionally the lime-and-clove syrup called falernum, swizzles are among the most effective heat busters in the bibulous kingdom. But they're not all based on rum. Here's a contemporary drink that takes the swizzle's foundation and revamps it in a spectacularly flavorful way: the Chartreuse Swizzle.

Created by San Francisco bartender Marcovaldo Dionysos, the Chartreuse Swizzle takes the basic elements of a Caribbean swizzle and sends them to grad school. By swapping the rum for green Chartreuse--a French herbal liqueur with a recipe dating back centuries--the Chartreuse Swizzle takes a simple summer cooler and turns the complexity level up to the proverbial eleven. The mixture may seem odd but in the glass, it works wonders. If you're looking for a unique and stunning drink to cool off with this August weekend, the Chartreuse Swizzle would be a good place to start.

About the author: Paul Clarke blogs about cocktails at The Cocktail Chronicles and writes regularly on spirits and cocktails for Imbibe magazine. He lives in Seattle, where he works as a writer and magazine editor.

Time for a Drink: Chartreuse Swizzle

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About This Recipe

Rated:

Ingredients

  • 1 1/4 ounce green Chartreuse
  • 1 ounce pineapple juice
  • 3/4 ounce lime juice
  • 1/2 ounce falernum*

Procedures

  1. 1

    Combine ingredients in a Collins glass and fill with crushed ice. Swizzle with a bar spoon or swizzle stick until the outside of the glass frosts, adding more crushed ice as needed. Serve with a straw and a satisfied expression.

  2. 2

    *Velvet Falernum is available in some liquor stores, and Fee Brothers makes a nonalcoholic falernum that is serviceable. Or, you can make your own.

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