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Make These Black Eyed Peas With Kale and Andouille for a Simple One-Pot Dinner

This easy black eyed pea stew starts with andouille sausage and pork belly cooked until browned and crisped, then gets flavored with the Holy Trinity of Cajun cuisine: onions, celery, and green bell peppers, along with some leeks and garlic for extra flavor. Tender braised kale transform this into a full-on meal, while a shot of apple cider vinegar brightens up all the flavors. More

The Food Lab: How to Make the Best Creamy White Chili With Chicken

To be frank, I'm not 100% certain where this dish of tender chicken and white beans bound in a creamy, fresh green-chili sauce topped with shredded cheese comes from. In fact, I wouldn't be surprised if the recipe actually originated on the back of a wrapper from a can of chopped green chilies. But our version is better than that. Much, much better. Tender, creamy, spicy, and bright, this is the stuff even a dyed-in-the-wool chile con carne traditionalist will dip their finger into when they think nobody is watching. More

Cheese 101: Southern Cheese Worth Seeking Out

Though the South is home to many delicacies, a longstanding cheese-making tradition isn't among them. But that's starting to change, and while cheesemakers are following all kinds of roads to cheese, the region's particular climate makes for some interesting commonalities among its increasingly delicious cheeses. More

Salted Caramel Soufflé From 'Baked Occasions'

Crafted for the late, great Julia Child, this salty-sweet soufflé from Baked Occasions celebrates the life of a woman who found her calling at fifty, and who taught her audience the secrets of French cooking in the comfort of their own kitchens. Make this to celebrate a great woman in your life, or anyone who has achieved lofty heights and sweet success (much like a caramel soufflé). More

Cracklin' Cornbread From 'Heritage'

Chef Sean Brock makes his no-flour-no-sugar cornbread with Anson Mills Antebellum Coarse Yellow Cornmeal, buttermilk for tang, and a single egg, leaving it light and corny. He also adds crisp crumbles of bacon (preferably Benton's) to the batter, as well as some of the bacon grease, to give the bread a vague and pleasant smokiness and decidedly savory edge. It's a very classic cornbread that would be as at home with a country supper as gracing the table at Husk. More

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