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Asparagus Ain't Sichuan, but Boy Does it Work in This Fiery Salad

Asparagus isn't exactly a Chinese ingredient, but that doesn't mean that it can't find a comfortable home in Chinese food. I've got no doubt that if asparagus were to grow in the cool, misty mountains near Chengdu, that we'd see it served as a cold green appetizer or side dish on menus in Sichuan. This recipe—cold and crunchy asparagus tossed with firm tofu in a fiery sweet-hot-sour vinaigrette—is really inspired by the host of cold or warm appetizers you find in Sichuan that make use of roasted chili oil, Sichuan peppercorns, and vinegar. More

How to Make the Ultimate Poutine

A perfect poutine is a trifecta of the best of its three ingredients—fries with a crisp exterior and soft interior, fresh and soft squeaky cheese curds, and a beefy brown gravy that's just flavorful enough without overwhelming the fries or curds. Getting each piece of the puzzle together for an ultimate version like this takes some time, but once complete, the reward is so good you'll go gaga even if you're totally sober. More

12 Kimchi Dishes We Love

Kimchi's distinctive funky kick pairs well with all sorts of ingredients, so we like to mix it into chicken salad, ramen, fried rice, and even use it as a burger topping. Not sure how to make the most of the jar bubbling away in your fridge? These 13 recipes will get you started. More

How to Make Stir-Fried Beef With Chinese Broccoli

Beef with broccoli is a staple of North American Chinese fast food joints, but the real version of this dish uses Chinese broccoli (gai lan), not the more familiar broccoli florets. Gai lan pairs perfectly with the strips of marinated beef, shallots, garlic, and oyster sauce in this easy dish. More

The Secrets of Amazing Soba: Behind the Scenes at Miyabi 45th

Dried noodles have mostly replaced homemade udon or soba in the Japanese home kitchen, but the fresh soba tradition is alive and well in Seattle at Miyabi 45th, where chef Mutsuko Soma rolls out noodles daily to make sure they are smooth enough to slurp, strong enough to dip, and subtle enough in presentation to let the quiet flavors of buckwheat whisper in each diner's mouth. More

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