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[Photograph: Helen Cathcart]

Those of us lucky enough to have childhood memories of picking fruit will most likely remember the dishes made from them. Paris Pastry Club author Fanny Zanotti recalls picking peaches and coming home with a trunkful of them, where they were transformed into a post-lunch dessert.

Baked her way, the peaches keep some of their firmness but melt a bit on the outside, soaking in mead. Thick yogurt is lightened with a meringue, which is then piped into ring molds and served with the peaches, the whole dish scattered with honeycomb candy. Beautifully messy and supremely enjoyable, it tastes like the height of summer.

Tips: Honey is a key flavor here, found both in the mead and honeycomb candy. So, don't substitute the mead for another alcohol—it should be available in most well-stocked wine stores. As for the honeycomb candy, it requires a spoonful of glucose syrup, which you can substitute for corn syrup. If you are intent on finding glucose syrup, check baking stores, as they sometimes sell it by the tub.

Tweaks: Making the iced yogurt requires the use of a ring mold. If you've never used them, they're small cylinders, usually metal. Before serving, the ring mold is slipped off, while the food within holds its shape. Ring molds can be found in any baking/restaurant supply store in a variety of sizes for around five dollars a pop. We like the idea of using a wider, shallower ring mold to create little dishes of iced yogurt, but you can use whichever small mold suits you.

As always with our Bake the Book feature, we have five (5) copies of Paris Pastry Club to give away.

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