Slideshow: A Tour Inside of Tokyo's Tsukiji, The World's Largest Fish Market

Row after Row
Row after Row

Rows and rows of live and frozen fish from every region of Japan. There are literally hundreds of rows like this. How you choose depends on years of a relationship with vendors.

[Photograph: Gillian Ferguson]

Arrivals
Arrivals
Every day except for Sunday, tons of fish fresh off the boats arrive in the inner Tsukiji market.
The Inner Market
The Inner Market

Shoppers are are typically big buyers from hotels and restaurants in Tokyo that deal in massive, daily volume.

[Photograph: Gillian Ferguson]

Slice and Dice
Slice and Dice
A Tsukiji vendor meticulously slices blood red fish to eat raw later.
The Chopping Block
The Chopping Block

An inner market Tsukiji vendor slices fish using generations-old knife techniqiues.

[Photograph: Gillian Ferguson]

Tuna Carcass
Tuna Carcass
Half a tuna carcass draped in paper, its blood all that’s left of it's vitality, in the inner Tsukiji market.
BBQ Swordfish
BBQ Swordfish
Red Octopus
Red Octopus
In the inner market, big fistfuls of red octopus from northern Japan.
Tuna for Sale
Tuna for Sale
Each of those chunks is retailing for about $35 USD.
Bonita for Sale
Bonita for Sale
This vendor sold me a one-kilo bag of crazy pink shaved bonita that in my broth made it seem as if I could hear the crashing of waves.
Dried Bonita
Dried Bonita
If you're the kind of person who prefers to shave his or her own, buy the actual dried bonita fish and make your own flakes at home.
Konbu for Sale
Konbu for Sale
This selection of konbu from Hokkaido makes it tough to decide what is best for making broth in your kitchen, but it's one of those times when buying the pricier stuff is really worth it.
Rice Spice
Rice Spice
A mix of dried seaweed, sesame seeds, dried Japanese peppers, and other spices will perk up your rice and at a third-generation shop in Tsukiji.
Unagi Restaurant
Unagi Restaurant
Freshly killed unagi doesn’t get any better. Basted in a sweet, sticky sauce and grilled, sprinkled with dry crushed Japanese peppers and served on a bed of rice, and accompanied by a cold draft beer. Seriously? It doesn’t get better. It just doesn’t.
Beef stew, delicious! Oiishi-des!
Beef stew, delicious! Oiishi-des!
After all that fish, what could be better than a good, big bowl of beef over noodles?