Gallery: Steakcraft International: The Dexter Rib Steak from Pitt Cue Co., London

Resting on the Trencher
Resting on the Trencher

The steak rests on the trencher.

What's Good for the Trencher...
What's Good for the Trencher...

....is good for the steak!

Removing the Bone
Removing the Bone

Adams begins breaking down the steak by removing the bone.

The Rib Bone
The Rib Bone

There's a lot of flavor in that handle.

Slicing The Eye
Slicing The Eye

Adams slices the eye of the steak for the table.

Seasoning
Seasoning

Maldon sea salt is used to season the finished steak. Note how Adams lifts the slices to season the inner flesh.

Arrangement
Arrangement

The sliced steak is placed atop the trencher.

The Glaze
The Glaze

The rendered dry-aged fat is blend with smoke drippings from Pitt Cue's smoker.

A Drizzle of Glaze
A Drizzle of Glaze

Adams finishes off the steak with the house glaze.

Tom Adams with the Cooked Steak
Tom Adams with the Cooked Steak

Ready for the table!

Sliced Steak on Plate
Sliced Steak on Plate

Prêt a Manager.

The Pitt Cue Co. Rib Steak
The Pitt Cue Co. Rib Steak

Dexter rib steak, dry-aged for 55 days.

The Aged Forerib
The Aged Forerib

This is the chuck (shoulder) end of the forerib.

Raw Forerib —Loin end
Raw Forerib —Loin end

The other side of the primal.

Forerib with Cut Chine Bone
Forerib with Cut Chine Bone

Notice that the chine bone was cut at the butchers, as it generally requires a band saw to remove.

Peeling the Fat Cap
Peeling the Fat Cap

Adams removes the fat cap from the forerib.

Trimming
Trimming

With the fat cap removed, Adams starts removing the hard, aged exterior.

The Reveal
The Reveal

Removing the darker crust reveals the inner flesh, which is a dark purple in color until the exposure to oxygen causes it to lighten.

Almost There
Almost There

The brown spots indicate that a little more trimming is in order.

Removing the chuck end cap
Removing the chuck end cap

After trimming the loin end, Adams starts work on the other side.

Portioning the Steaks
Portioning the Steaks

The steak size is determined by the bones. Dexter cattle are much smaller than the average American steer. American veal chops are bigger than this fully grown specimen.

Cutting the Steaks
Cutting the Steaks
The Portioned Steak
The Portioned Steak

This still needs a little trimming.

Trimming the Steak
Trimming the Steak

Adams whittles away a few specks of hardened flesh.

The Scraps
The Scraps

The aged scraps are ground down and rendered to produce a high quality and intensely flavored oil.

A Boy and His Rib Steak
A Boy and His Rib Steak

Adams is ready to cook the steak.

The Fire
The Fire

On the day I visited, they were cooking over sweet chestnut.

Steak on Tray
Steak on Tray

The trimmed steak is ready for seasoning.

Seasoning
Seasoning

Sea salt is applied.

Onto the Grill
Onto the Grill

Adams places the steak over the coals.

Developing the Sear
Developing the Sear

Adams never lets the steak rest in once place for too long. "I want to avoid the band of grey," he says.

Smoking
Smoking

As Adams works the steak, the smoke billows from the coals.

The Flipside
The Flipside
Searing all Sides
Searing all Sides

Because of the thickness of the steak, Adams grills all sides of the cut.

Working the Grill
Working the Grill

Adams tends to his steak.

Resting
Resting

After being cooked, the steak is allowed to rest for a good ten minutes to allow the juices to redistribute through the cut.

Whipped Marrow
Whipped Marrow

This will be used to garnish the steak.

Marrow on the Trencher
Marrow on the Trencher

The trencher (a bread plate) is smeared with a generous amount of marrow butter.