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[Photographs: Yasmin Fahr]

Thanksgiving's requisite food comas and frantic kitchen projects leave little desire to cook up a storm over the days that follow. But you're faced with the inevitable issue of leftovers. While this is a fantastic problem to have, and can result in amazing day-after sandwiches—anyone remember this Friends episode with the gravy-soaked layer of bread? Definitely spent a few years trying to master that one—it can get a bit tiresome.

Sometimes, I don't want a sandwich, but need to use up the contents of all the tupperware stuffed into the fridge. Enter this easy frittata.

Usually, I just cook up a variety of vegetables, finish them off with eggs and throw the whole thing in the oven or under the broiler for a dinner that comes together in less than 20 minutes. We're going to apply the basics of a frittata using common Thanksgiving leftovers: Roast turkey, Brussels sprouts, and green beans. While I opted for fresh vegetables, if you find yourself with a plethora of leftover sides, then feel free to use those—just cut them up and add them with the turkey instead of cooking them ahead of time, and then proceed with the recipe as written. That said, fresh vegetables do give leftovers a lift, so if you have any extra veggies on hand, then I'd definitely recommend adding them in.

When it comes to cooking your frittata, there are various schools of thought, from cooking it on a stovetop to finishing it in the oven or under the broiler to get a crisp top. I'm a fan of starting out on the stovetop and finishing it under the broiler, but if you're having one of those I-just-don't-want-to-deal days, then feel free to turn on the oven to 350, and, after you finish cooking the vegetables and adding the eggs, stick your skillet in the oven for 8 to 10 minutes. You just wont get a surface that's quite as crisp.

The stovetop-inclined will want to watch out for the bottom burning, so be careful with the heat and avoid turning it up too high. If you feel like it's burning, then turn on the oven and let it finish in more gentle heat.

About the Author: Yasmin Fahr is a food lover, writer, and cook. Follow her @yasminfahr for more updates on her eating adventures and discoveries, which will most likely include tomatoes. And probably feta. Happy eating!

Every recipe we publish is tested, tasted, and Serious Eats-approved by our staff. Never miss a recipe again by following @SeriousRecipes on Twitter!

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