Slideshow: Market Scene: Alemany Farmers' Market, San Francisco

Chestnuts
Chestnuts

Glenn Tanimoto of Gridley, CA shows off his chestnuts with their spiky hulls still attached. It’s inspiration for the most beautiful Thanksgiving centerpiece Martha Stewart never imagined. For eating purposes, you can buy hulled ones. Because they’re so young, you can nosh them raw, which is how Tanimoto prefers to do things. If cooking, he recommends boiling over roasting because you don’t have to slit a vent in each one to ensure they wont' blow up in the oven. Plus, unlike roasted chestnuts, which harden upon cooling, boiled ones will stay soft and keep in the refrigerator.

Sticky Corn
Sticky Corn

Crouch alongside other shoppers as they peel the husks off sticky corn and drop the dwarf cobs into their plastic bags. This variety is starchier than white corn and not as sweet. The Moua family, Hmong refugees who came to the US in 1987 from Laos, also grow a plethora of other Southeast Asian produce, including explosive Thai chiles which they’ll have until November.

Rattlesnake Beans
Rattlesnake Beans

Apolinar Yerena, owner of Yerena Farms, brought these special beans from Jalisco to his farm near Watsonville. Their mottled surface and flavor resembles cranberry beans, but you can eat these ones whole. Toss the entire pod into boiling water for a few minutes. They’ll turn purplish-black when finished.

Wing Beans
Wing Beans

Aha, we found the prom queen of produce. These fluttery beans attracted plenty of glances and clucks from passersby. The whole pod is edible, an asset considering that they cost $8 per pound.

Mixed Citrus
Mixed Citrus

How do you identify the best Lisbon Lemon for a customer? Sniff it. You’ll find plenty of other obscure citrus fruits from Bernard Ranches, like olinda oranges, blush grapefruit, and bearss limes.

Late Season Grapes
Late Season Grapes

These late season, plump, and sugary grapes from Benzler Farms include green Autumn Kings, red Scarlet Royals, and purple Autumn Royals. “Tasting is mandatory,” says grower Tom Benzler (pictured).

Bitter Eggplant
Bitter Eggplant

I first tasted these minuscule round eggplants in a coconut curry in Bangkok. I mistook them for grapes, because they were so small. Their bitter flavor marries with the natural sweetness of coconut. The red and orange ones are ripe.

Jujubes
Jujubes

Even though I don’t understand the appeal of jujubes—not quite crunchy and not quite soft, marginally sweet with hardly any juice—plenty of other people do, as evidenced by the crowds sorting through the bin searching for the darkest ones.

Pupusas from Estrellita’s Snacks
Pupusas from Estrellita’s Snacks

Here’s the pupusa you crave—thick masa disks that owner Maria del Carmen shapes to-order, stuffs with refried beans, melted cheese, meat and/or mushrooms, and griddles until toasty on both sides. A sharp curtido (El Salvadorean cabbage slaw) cuts through the heaviness. It’s a $3 lunch that’ll easily keep you full until dinner.

Pizza from Copper Top Ovens
Pizza from Copper Top Ovens

“There are 50,000 pizzerias in America, and we have this little niche,” says Tom Gerstel, owner of Copper Top Ovens. That’s why he doesn’t have plans to open a shop. He also only has one oven—a wood-fired beauty inspired by ancient versions used in Europe. Gerstel cranks it to 1000ºF when he’s catering a party and needs to cook pizzas in 90 seconds. At Alemany, he keeps it at 750ºF to 800ºF to cook whole ($12) or half ($7) pies in two minutes. His crust is thin, delicate, and cracker-crisp. It’s so good some customers order it with a smear of tomato sauce and no other toppings. But doing that would mean missing out on the caramelized figs, sweet Gala apples, walnuts, mascarpone, and woozy aroma of truffle oil that outfits his current Market Special.