Slideshow: Reflecting on Singapore's World Streetfood Congress

Penang Assam Laksa, Gurney Drive Assam Laksa (Malaysia)
Penang Assam Laksa, Gurney Drive Assam Laksa (Malaysia)
Singapore has its own version of laksa, but Penang is also of laksa fame with its sour, spicy flavors. Singaporean Katong laksa uses coconut milk, lending a richer broth, whereas Penang laksa has a clearer broth made of mackerel stewed in tamarind, lemongrass, chili, and fermented shrimp paste. Gurney Drive Assam Laksa is a family-run operation that has used their grandmother's recipe for the past three generations.
Pork sandwich, Meyers Køkken (Denmark)
Pork sandwich, Meyers Køkken (Denmark)
From Copenhagen, Claus Meyer, the co-founder of Noma and TV host of 'Meyer's Kitchen,' brought the Nordic version of a pork sandwich. The team brought their own rye flour for the bread from Denmark, along with a cache of housemade vinegars and oils.
Pork at Meyers Køkken
Pork at Meyers Køkken
For the Danish version of what constitutes as street food, Meyers' sandwich was packed with locally sourced roast pork, apples, blackcurrant sauerkraut, pork rinds, and mustard seeds.
The People's Pig
The People's Pig
From Portland, a second stall sat at the opposite end from Meyers Køkken, serving their interpretation of a pork sandwich. Using what was locally provided, the People's Pig's sandwich was made of fat slices pork roast, arugula, chopped chili, and a smear of fennel seed and garlic paste between ciabatta slices.  
The People's Pig
The People's Pig
Portland native Tyler Hauptman, who was serving at the People's Pig that day, did admit that the overall sandwich was different in Singapore since the cart didn't have access to their usual produce and baker.
Chicken 65 at Abishek (India)
Chicken 65 at Abishek (India)
One of the most unassuming stalls at WSFC, this is India's deep-fried chicken. Narayan Swamy started selling this dish about twelve years ago after his stint as an assistant cook at a local hotel.The spicy, crisp chicken was seasoned with ginger, cayenne and mustard, and some of our best-spent three bucks.
Kerak Telor
Kerak Telor
Made with eggs, glutinous rice, serundeng (fried shredded coconut) and fried shallots, the resulting dish is a fluffy omelette-like disc with light, smoky flavors.
Tostadas at La Guerrerense (Mexico)
Tostadas at La Guerrerense (Mexico)
One of the liveliest stalls despite the thin crowd and thick humidity was the mother-daughter team behind La Guerrernse's seafood tostadas. Known for their flawless tostadas and fresh, colorful ceviches and salsas, Singaporeans could finally see why Bourdain proclaimed La Guerrense as one of his favorite street food stalls, ever.
La Guerrerense
La Guerrerense
The mother-daughter team behind La Guerrerense strike a pose.
Banh Xeo at Phan Rang 38
Banh Xeo at Phan Rang 38
This eggy "sizzling pancake" was stuffed with fresh seafood and bean sprouts, and cooked to a golden crisp.
Banh Khot and Banh Xeo at Phan Rang 38
Banh Khot and Banh Xeo at Phan Rang 38
The finished products were served simply with fish sauce and lettuce.
Nam Bo's Chuoi Nuong (Vietnam)
Nam Bo's Chuoi Nuong (Vietnam)
This gooey dessert was particularly hard to pass up, as it was located at the entrance to the Jamboree. Choi nuong is made from glutinous rice and coconut milk wrapped around a sweet banana, then toasted in a banana leaf over charcoal fire until it crisps on the outside.
Kue Pancong (Indonesia)
Kue Pancong (Indonesia)
Made with a specific pan with half circular molds, the snack is simply made of coconut, rice flour, coconut milk, salt, and generous sprinkles of granulated sugar.
Kue Pancong
Kue Pancong
Savory yet sweet from the crisp, toasted coating and creamy filling, this warm, comforting snack has an addictive quality to it. I even took an extra order of these to go, bringing home the treats for a second helping later in the night.