Slideshow: Market Scene: University District Farmers Market in Seattle, WA

Morel Mushrooms
Morel Mushrooms

Washington’s forested mountains are prime mushroom territory, and at any given time there’s usually a handful of varieties on the table at Foraged and Found. While the morels at grocery stores can skyrocket to almost $50 a pound, these guys consistently have the best ones around at less than half the price.

Porcini Mushrooms
Porcini Mushrooms

The meatiest of the local mushrooms, these gentle giants are displayed cut in half to show that they’re not filled with worms, eliminating an unfortunate risk.

Whole Salmon
Whole Salmon

One stereotype Seattle’s in no hurry to dispel is that fresh salmon is abundant and amazing around here. Loki Fish Company brings whole salmon of multiple types—on this visit, there were king, sockeye, and pink—and portioned fillets. Out of season, they’ll bring in frozen salmon, too, but their various salmon products are always in season: ikura (salmon roe), salmon jerky, and smoked, canned, or pickled salmon.

Clams and Mussels
Clams and Mussels

Sweet shellfish are a staple year-round, anchoring the market and drawing customers in the dark winter months.

Tayberries
Tayberries

One of the many varieties resulting from crossing blackberries and raspberries. How many other offspring of that pair can you name?

Black Cap Raspberries
Black Cap Raspberries

The darker, slightly hardier sister of your classic raspberry.

Vans Cherries
Vans Cherries

Cherry season is one of the highlights of the local food year in Washington, and the Vans in the front here are a super-sweet favorite for snacking. They look (and taste) quite a bit like the better-known Bing.

Rainier Cherries
Rainier Cherries

Actually a cross between the previously-mentioned Bing and Van cherries, the Rainier is prized for its sweetness and great texture.

Puget Crimson Strawberries
Puget Crimson Strawberries

Strawberry, the first berry of the season, is already starting to peter out, but the late-season variety, Puget Crimson, isn't finished just yet. Like many of the local strawberries, these are bred for sugar and flavor, so the shelf life is short—but nobody can wait to eat them, anyway.

Saskatoon Berries
Saskatoon Berries

Also known as juneberry or serviceberry, the year’s first wild berries look a little like blueberries. According to the forager, saskatoon berries “have a dry texture and a soft seed which tastes like marzipan.”

Loghouse Cheese from Kurtwood Farms
Loghouse Cheese from Kurtwood Farms

One of Seattle’s favorite cheesemakers, Kurt Timmermeister of Kurtwood Farms, recently came out with his third cheese, an aged tomme called Loghouse. As of this writing, the soft and savory cheese is available exclusively at the University District Farmers Market.

Garlic Scapes
Garlic Scapes

Another spring hanger-on-er, but one that goes great on the summer grill, folded into burgers, or tossed into tacos.

Asparagus
Asparagus

The same vegetable that was heralded just a few months ago as the first green of the season is now fading out.

Zucchini Blossoms
Zucchini Blossoms

Early harbingers of the summer squash, the fragile flowers are can be stuffed with cheese and deep-fried or stuck inside a quesadilla.

Green Apricots
Green Apricots

A unique farm called Mair Taki grows excellent Japanese produce, including chrysanthemum greens, the crispest cucumbers, giant daikon radishes, and these lovely green apricots, which, as promised, are good for making umeboshi. If that seems ambitious, they’ll often sell their own homemade version of the Japanese-style pickled fruit.

Kim Chi
Kim Chi

Woodring has long been a fixture of the market on Saturday mornings, but it recently added an intriguing new product. After spending time learning at the home of a Korean woman, her husband acting as translator, the producer began making her own kim chi, aged in traditional fermenting crocks.