Slideshow: Silk Road Garden: Discovering Uyghur Cuisine In Los Angeles

Spicy Chicken with Potato
Spicy Chicken with Potato

This dish (small $16.95/large $19.95), when translated from Chinese, is literally called "big plate chicken." It’s a classic meat and potatoes platter you can order with or without bones. Spicy chicken cubes are sautéed with star anise, dates, Sichuan peppercorns, wood ear, potatoes and bell peppers over a helping of flat hand-cut noodles. The small portion (pictured) is large enough to comfortably feed a group of three.

Meat pie
Meat pie
Baked in-house, the meat pie ($11.99) is a flaky sandwich akin to a pot pie but thinner, disc-shaped and stuffed with ground lamb.
Special Laghman Handmade Noodles
Special Laghman Handmade Noodles
Known as Laghman noodles in English, this dish ($11.89) is named after the Laghman Province in eastern Afghanistan where it has its roots. The Chinese name, ban mian, implies that the noodles are freshly pulled and then thrown into boiling water. The noodles are made by kneading the dough, cutting it into long pieces and then rolling the strands into a disk before boiling them. It’s served with a helping of onions, lamb, tomatoes, wood ear mushrooms and bell peppers.
Lamb Kebabs
Lamb Kebabs
Kebabs are bazaar staples in Muslim-dominated regions of China. Lamb can be awfully gamey if done wrong, but at Silk Road, it’s cooked until juicy and seasoned with a tongue-tingling combination of chili flakes and cumin, with a faint hint of lemon. ($1.99/ea)
Xinjiang Yogurt
Xinjiang Yogurt
The Xinjiang yogurt ($2.75) is also made in-house, providing a tangy and light contrast to the heavy, tongue-numbing spices typical of the cuisine. The yogurt is similar to its Greek counterpart but heavier, and topped with a splattering of sesame seeds, honey and raisins.
Lamb Dumplings
Lamb Dumplings
The dumplings ($8) are stuffed with minced lamb and onions and seasoned liberally with pepper and cumin.
Exterior of the restaurant
Exterior of the restaurant