Gallery: Get to Know Tianjin Food in Los Angeles

Tan Jin Shredded ($6.99)
Tan Jin Shredded ($6.99)
Called dongbei da lapi in Chinese, this is a mung bean noodle dish made with shredded pork, egg, parsley, carrots, garlic and cucumber. It's drenched in a vinegar sauce and paired with Chinese hot mustard.
Tianjin Buns ($6.49)
Tianjin Buns ($6.49)
These savory steamed pork buns might be the most popular dish at Tianjin Bistro. Dip them in a saucer of black vinegar for an extra zing.
Shredded Pork with Fermented Bean Paste ($7.99)
Shredded Pork with Fermented Bean Paste ($7.99)
This is a popular Northern Chinese dish. Shredded pork with fermented bean paste paired with cucumbers and julienned scallions. Kind of the "poor man's" version of Peking duck.
Shredded Pork Wrap
Shredded Pork Wrap
The wrapping method: you put all of the ingredients onto tofu skin and eat it whole.
Chive Turnovers ($5.99)
Chive Turnovers ($5.99)
Northern Chinese food is famous for their different types of buns. This is a pan-fried dumpling stuffed with thinly chopped chives, egg, and pork.
Sauteed Triple Delight ($8.99)
Sauteed Triple Delight ($8.99)
A popular Tianjin dish that pairs well with rice wine. It's a triple delight with pork, kidney, and liver that's been stir-fried with soy sauce, vinegar, onion and garlic.
Pork Bun ($7.99)
Pork Bun ($7.99)
Crispy sesame-crusted bread stuffed with fatty pork cubes and parsley.
Baked Cornbread with Yellow Croaker ($12.99)
Baked Cornbread with Yellow Croaker ($12.99)
Because Tianjin is one of the largest harbor cities in China, the cuisine tends to capitalize on local seafood. This is a popular Tianjin delicacy that uses stewed yellow croakers (bones and head still attached) and serves them with fresh cornbread. The Chinese pronunciation: "tie bo bo ao xiao yu." Watch out: there's quite a few bones in this little fish.
Spicy Crawfish (16.99)
Spicy Crawfish (16.99)
Despite their popularity in China, crawfish (known as xiaolongxia, or little dragon shrimp) do not have a long history in Chinese cuisine. It was only in the late 1990s that the fad swept across the mainland. They are cooked with hot spices and enjoyed with a cold brewski on mid-summer evenings. How to eat it: Suck on the head to get the spices out. Peel off the shell, get rid of the intestines, and eat whatever meat is left.