Slideshow: 17 Recipes to Make You Feel Irish on St. Patrick's Day

Irish Brown Bread
Irish Brown Bread

If you want a big old slice of nubbly, oaty bread that just begs to be spread with a layer of thick jam or a melting pat of butter, try this Irish brown bread. Coarse wheat flour lends a vaguely sweet, honey flavor and a hint of toasted oats.

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[Photograph: Carrie Vasios]

Irish Morning Bread
Irish Morning Bread

This dough is made from whole wheat flour, oats, and a heavy dose of raisins, all which give it a particularly lumpy appearance. Yet those same ingredients are what gives this bread character. The raisins add pops of chewy sweetness and the mixture of oats and brown flour create a dense but moist crumb with a strong wheat flavor. Topped with sugar, it has a crackly-sweet crust, indulgent and wholesome at the same time.

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[Photograph: Carrie Vasios]

Soda Bread with Dried Cranberries
Soda Bread with Dried Cranberries

For all you raisin-haters out there: this is the soda bread for you. Cranberries give this bread all the fruitiness it needs, along with that signature cranberry tartness.

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[Photograph: Donna Currie]

Corned Beef, Potatoes, Cabbage and Carrots
Corned Beef, Potatoes, Cabbage and Carrots

Kenji cooked over 37 pounds of beef to bring you the recipe for corned beef perfection. Beefy, salty, and moist, this dish is frickin' delicious. And of course you cook the veggies in the corned beef water.

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[Photograph: J. Kenji Lopez-Alt]

Stout-Battered Onion Rings
Stout-Battered Onion Rings

A lot of beer-battered onion rings don't end up tasting like beer. The stout-based batter on these onion rings makes them much more flavorful. Throw in a little spice, some tangy mustard, a touch of honey for sweetness, and the package is complete.

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[Photograph: Caroline Ford]

Stout Beef Stew
Stout Beef Stew

This Guinness stew begs you to tuck in for a warm, soul-satisfying meal. A little carrot, a little potato, loads of sweet cipollini onion, and tender chunks of beef: it's a simple dish but such a good one. The only accompaniment you'll need is a crusty loaf of bread and big glass of bold red wine...or a pint of Guinness.

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[Photograph: Caroline Ford]

Cottage Pie with Shallots and Sherry
Cottage Pie with Shallots and Sherry

Beef up your mashed potatoes by tucking a layer of braised beef underneath and baking it off.

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[Photograph: Sydney Oland]

Champ with Sausages
Champ with Sausages

Champ is a simple but delicious dish where creamy mashed potatoes are mixed with a good helping of milk and butter and studded with scallions. Served with sausages, this is a complete main course, and the green parsley adds a festive touch.

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[Photograph: Carrie Vasios]

Shepherd's Pie
Shepherd's Pie

This recipe for shepherd’s pie is straightforward, flavorful, and an exceedingly satisfying thing to cook on a winter evening.

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[Photograph: Robyn Lee]

Corned Beef Hash
Corned Beef Hash

Got some corned beef leftover from the festive meal? Hash-ify it with diced potatoes, poblano chile, a sizable squirt of ketchup or chile sauce, and runny yolked eggs that nestle right into the pan.

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[Photograph: Robyn Lee]

Bangers and Mash with Onion Gravy
Bangers and Mash with Onion Gravy

Bangers and mash are a public house classic, some fatty sausages with buttery potatoes perfect for soaking up an afternoon's worth of ale.

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[Photograph: Sydney Oland]

Roast Potatoes
Roast Potatoes

The secret to the crispiest roast potatoes is increased surface area. Toss your potatoes around with a metal spoon to get the most nooks and crannies in your taters, nooks and crannies that will make for an extra crunchy surface.

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[Photograph: J. Kenji Lopez-Alt]

Ultra Fluffy Mashed Potatoes
Ultra Fluffy Mashed Potatoes

The key to super fluffy mashed potatoes is to remove as much starch from the spuds as possible. We accomplish this by peeling and dicing them before rinsing them in water and boiling them just until cooked. Using a ricer or food mill prevents excess damage to the starch granules, helping the potatoes remain nice and light.

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[Photograph: J. Kenji Lopez-Alt]