Gallery: Behind the Scenes: Making Matzo at the Manischewitz Factory

The Mixing Room
The Mixing Room
Flour and water (that's it!) are mixed together then dumped into this flattening machine; out come the dough sheets on the other side. The kosher flour is sourced from a farm in Lancaster, PA, where it's under rabbinical supervision.
Flattening
Flattening
The dough sheets are pressed, becoming half as thin each time they go through another machine.
Roll it out
Roll it out
Biscuit and Cracker Plant Machinery
Biscuit and Cracker Plant Machinery
So Many Squares
So Many Squares
6 by 6 inches, each matzo square on the conveyer belt should be identical to its neighbor.
Monitoring the Matzo
Monitoring the Matzo
This man wearing the beard net watches as they go by, making sure there are no cracks or other deformities. The factory also has five mashgiach on call during production, supervising the kashrut status of every machine and ingredient used, certifying that it's all following kosher laws.
Scraps Bin
Scraps Bin
If not perfect, the matzo dough scraps go into this bin.
Ready for the oven
Ready for the oven
Hole-punched and ready to be baked.
Close-up
Close-up
Warm in here!
Warm in here!
The oven room gets really toasty with the gas oven always set at 700-degrees F. Matzo moves continuously through the 150-foot long oven, never stopping, to ensure a quick-bake time of just a few minutes.
Bricks
Bricks
The bricks inside the oven keep the temperature controlled.
Lotsa Matzo
Lotsa Matzo
Once out of the oven, the browned squares cool for 150 feet down the conveyer belt, then they're off to be packaged in boxes.
Guinness Record
Guinness Record
In case you were curious, the longest matzo ever recorded (7.29 meters long, 1.05 meters wide) was created here at Manischewitz headquarters, naturally.
Le Shem Matzos Mitzvah
Le Shem Matzos Mitzvah