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Laos Travels: A Guide To Laotian Noodle Soups

[Photographs: Jamie Feldmar]

Laotian food isn't particularly well-known in the States. Many of the flavors are similar to those used in Northern Thai cuisine, but Lao fare tends to be more bitter, more earthy, and less spicy than the food of its neighbors. Still, there's a lot to love, from the chopped meat salads known as laaps to the hearty meat-and-eggplant stew orlam.

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Oodles of noodles on display at a market in Vientiene. Dried rice vermicelli at left, and three sizes of of rice-and-tapioca flour khao piak sen noodles, dusted with fresh flour, to the right.

But the food you'll encounter most often on the streets—in cities and one-street villages alike—are noodle soups, which are eaten mainly for breakfast and lunch. Noodle soups are their own galaxy here. The variety of noodles alone makes it possible to eat a different kind of noodle soup every day for a week without repeats, and the Lao love of condiments means that every table comes equipped with at least half a dozen different sauces/chilis/vinegars/pickled things to further customize your bowl. Here's a look at some of the soups to seek out in Luang Prabang, Vang Vieng, and Vientiane.

About the author: Jamie Feldmar is a Brooklyn-based freelance writer and editor eating her way across Southeast Asia for the next three months. See more of her work at jamiefeldmar.com or follow her misadventures on Twitter at @jfeldmar.

Printed from http://www.seriouseats.com/2013/02/laos-travels-a-guide-to-lao-noodle-soups.html

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