Slideshow: 15+ New Orleans Recipes We Love for Mardi Gras

Muffuletta Sandwich
Muffuletta Sandwich
Though it's pretty much impossible to find real muffaletta bread outside of New Orleans, Italian focaccia is very closely related so it should do the trick here. The uniqueness really comes with the olive spread painted on both sides of the bread. Ingredients can range from celery to capers to pickled cauliflower, depending on who's making it. It wins for best-named sandwich too, right? Get the recipe »

[Photograph: J. Kenji López-Alt]

Shrimp, Andouille and Okra Gumbo
Shrimp, Andouille and Okra Gumbo
In this recipe the okra is used to thicken and add body to the final product, breaking down as the gumbo simmers and reduces. The final dish is one that satisfies all my hangover needs; carbs, heat, salt and fat. Get the recipe »

[Photograph: Sydney Oland]

Turkey Neck Gumbo
Turkey Neck Gumbo
Like so many stews, gumbo is the vehicle for whatever protein—meat or seafood, or a little of both—that you see fit to add. I'm partial to my rendition with necks, but any fresh, roasted, or smoked turkey meat is succulent when stewed in gumbo. Invest the time in toasting the roux; the rest is history. Get the recipe »

[Photograph: Robyn Lee]

Roast Beef Po' Boy
Roast Beef Po' Boy
"Roast beef" is a bit of a misnomer, because the meat in question is actually boiled or braised before being cooked down in a thick, garlicky gravy until it literally begins to fall apart. The resultant sliced meat is piled high on top of one of the crusty, fluffy, and slightly chewy french loaves (more akin to a Vietnamese-style banh mi bread than anything else, really) and doused with copious amounts of the gravy, studded with bits of shredded beef "debris." Get the recipe »

[Photograph: Kenji Lopez-Alt]

Fried Oyster Po' Boy
Fried Oyster Po' Boy
The magnificent po' boy, toast of the New Orleans sandwich scene, is distinguished from the submarine primarily by the bread on which it's made. The po' boy eschews Italian rolls for light-on-the-inside, crispy-on-the-outside New Orleans French bread. You can stuff this bread with almost anything. New Orleans being a coastal city, fried seafood is a popular filling. Equally big, though, is gravy-drowned roast beef. Get the recipe »

[Photograph: Nick Kindelsperger]

Fried Squid Po' Boy with Avocado and Black Chile Oil
Fried Squid Po' Boy with Avocado and Black Chile Oil
This po' boy is drizzled with black chile oil and layered with avocado slices before being topped with handfuls of crispy squid. The creamy avocado is the right foil for the crunchy squid. The black chile oil is certainly spicy, but it is lightly applied, so it doesn't mess with any of the other ingredients. The only advice I have is to get a lot of napkins. This thing is a glorious mess. Get the recipe »

[Photograph: Nick Kindelsperger]

Grilled Chicken and Sausage Jambalaya
Grilled Chicken and Sausage Jambalaya
Grilled chicken thighs, andouille, and tomatoes are added to rice, with stock, aromatics, and seasoning, making for a dish that's meaty, fresh, and spicy, all at once. Get the recipe »

[Photograph: Joshua Bousel]

Cajun Chicken Wings
Cajun Chicken Wings
The wings start with a coating of Cajun seasoning, and some baking powder that will help get a crisp skin on the grill. The highly seasoned skin gives them an earthy and spicy coating and the sauce has a complexity that goes beyond the standard Buffalo. Get the recipe »

[Photograph: Joshua Bousel]

Fried Pickles With Spicy Remoulade
Fried Pickles With Spicy Remoulade
Crunchy and briney kosher dills get battered and fried, and are served up with a spicy remoulade for dipping. Get the recipe »

[Photograph: Jennifer Olvera

Cajun Spiced Barbecue Ribs
Cajun Spiced Barbecue Ribs
In contrast to traditional barbecue ribs, where the rub is usually a balance of sweet and spicy, these bones are a more herbal, earthy, with a slight kick of heat. The meat is smoky, moist, and with all the right pull-off-the-bone tenderness. The best part? You still get a ton of Cajun seasoning left to keep going, so be prepared for wings, catfish, and shrimp boil skewers to come! Get the recipe »

[Photograph: Joshua Bousel]

Spicy Crab Dip
Spicy Crab Dip

In the Grand Hierarchy of Dips (if there were such a thing), crab dip perhaps lies near the bottom of the totem pole—well below the likes of salsa, guacamole, onion dip, spinach dip, and even ranch. But as anyone from Maryland can perhaps attest, crab dip is a tastier and more interesting options with which to anoint that crudité platter or bag of chips. This crab dip is a spicy-creamy concoction of tangy cream cheese and sweet crab meat. It's a combination of flavors that will surely benefit any carrot stick, cracker, or chip.

Get the recipe »

[Photograph: Marvin Gapultos]

Louisiana Remoulade
Louisiana Remoulade
Remoulade originated in France in a combination most closely resembling tarter sauce, bringing together mayo, herbs, pickles, and capers. Of course, in the American spirit, we took this sauce, amped it up, and made it something all our own. Louisiana remoulade starts with a mayo base as well, but then adds ingredient after ingredient to form a reddish complex sauce that's creamy, tart, and spicy. Get the recipe »

[Photograph: Joshua Bousel]