Gallery: Camden, ME: Incredible Thai Food at Long Grain

Steamed Pork and Seaweed Dumplings ($8)
Steamed Pork and Seaweed Dumplings ($8)
Paper-thin wrappers hold together delicate, remarkably tender pork and local seaweed meatballs.
Pad See Ew ($12.50)
Pad See Ew ($12.50)
As if the tender yet elastic homemade rice sheets weren't tempting enough, the kitchen at Long Grain is one of few Thai restaurants that puts a really hard sear on the stir-fries. The protein options are all great, but don't miss the incredibly fresh Heiwa tofu. Frilly local kale replaces Chinese broccoli, and they jump straight to pickled jalapeños instead of serving chile-spiked vinegar.
Pad Ke Mao ($12.50)
Pad Ke Mao ($12.50)
The noodles, greens, char, and (by my choice) tofu are the same as in the pad see ew, but the oyster mushrooms and chili paste make this dish the standout of the two.
Kimchi with Pork Belly and Rice Cake ($11.50)
Kimchi with Pork Belly and Rice Cake ($11.50)
They get the acidity and heat right here—just sour and spicy enough—the thin-sliced pork belly is crispy at the edges, and the rice cakes are cut from the same chewy rice dough that they use to make the noodles.
Kao Soi ($10.50)
Kao Soi ($10.50)
If you've seen the front cover of the March 2013 issue of Bon Appetit, this rich, heady Chiang Mai classic will look familiar. Below the broth is a tangle of steamed egg noodles (excellent, but not homemade), dark-meat chicken, red onion, and cilantro.
Coconut Custard with Black Sticky Rice
Coconut Custard with Black Sticky Rice
You won't have room for dessert, but order this anyway. The brûléed top, the custardy base, the sweet sticky rice, and the warm coconut milk "sauce" came together as one of the best sweets I've had in a long time.