20121005-224509-cook-the-book-stuffed-trout.jpg

Stuffed Ruby Trout, Fennel, Scallion, Lemon, and Herbs [Photograph: Bruce Wolf]

Salmon and trout make up a huge part of the Pacific Northwest's seafood economy, so it's no surprise that hyper-local restaurants like Ned Ludd in Portland feature fish prominently on their menu. Most of these dishes at Ned Ludd are prepared in their huge wood-fired oven, which means adaptation is the name of the game when cooking this fish at home.

To adapt this recipe for everyday kitchens in Laurie Wolf's Portland, Oregon Chef's Table, they move their wood-fired Stuffed Ruby Trout to a hot oven and then crisp the skin under the broiler. This quick-cook method makes for crackling, blistered skin with moist flesh beneath. (Just be sure to watch the fish closely!)

But this is not mere roast fish; Ned Ludd's trout is taken to a whole 'nother level with a punchy rub of mustard seeds (yellow and brown), fennel seeds, and fresh white pepper, as well as charred scallions and fennel cooked beneath the fish (soaking up all of the marvelous rendered fat and fish juices).

Why I picked this recipe: Roast trout and charred vegetables make for an easy, rustic dinner that I couldn't resist.

What worked: Fennel and mustard seeds work wonders on the tender, rich trout flesh, and the charred fennel and scallions added verdant fragrance to an otherwise earthy dish.

What didn't: I needed to cook the fennel and scallions a bit longer than the fish to turn them tender. Next time, I'd give them a 5 to 10 minute head-start with a drizzle of olive oil so that they'd be ready to eat at the same time as the fish.

Suggested tweaks: This recipe would be easy to tweak depending on available fresh vegetables. I'd stick with hearty roots and alliums for roasting under the fish (slivers of winter squash and onions would be great for fall) and herbs to stuff inside (thyme, for example).

As always with our Cook the Book feature, we have five (5) copies of Portland, Oregon Chef's Table to give away.

About the author: Kate Williams is a freelance writer out of Berkeley, CA. She is a contributor to The Oxford American and blogs at cookingwolves.wordpress.com.

Comments can take up to a minute to appear - please be patient!

Previewing your comment: