Slideshow: The Serious Eats Guide To Dumpling Styles Around the World

Guo Tie (A.K.A. potstickers)
Guo Tie (A.K.A. potstickers)

[Photographs: J. Kenji Lopez-Alt]

Made with fresh wrappers and eaten straight out of the wok (or frying pan, of you prefer), they rank up there with burgers and mapo tofu as World's Awesome Foodstuff. The perfect fried dumpling should have a golden brown, ultra-crisp fried bottom, with a skin that's springy and chewy, but never tough or doughy. The fillings can vary by taste, but our favorite combination is pork and cabbage.

Get the Recipe: Fried Dumplings »

Shui Jiao (boilied dumplings)
Shui Jiao (boilied dumplings)

[Photographs: J. Kenji Lopez-Alt]

Boiled dumplings made with a wheat-based wrapper, pinched into a crescent. Pork and vegetable are common fillings.

Zheng Jiao (steamed dumplings)
Zheng Jiao (steamed dumplings)

[Photographs: J. Kenji Lopez-Alt]

More delicate than boiled dumplings, made with a very thin wrapper that can be made from any number of starches. The fillings range from pork and chives, to shrimp, cabbage, or any number of vegetables.

Chiu-Chao Fan Gow
Chiu-Chao Fan Gow

[Photographs: J. Kenji Lopez-Alt]

Thin starch-enhanced wrappers filled with a crunchy, fresh-tasting mix of shrimp, pork, and peanuts, often flavored with cilantro and crisp chunks of jicama. These are awesome if you're looking for a unique textural experience in your dumplings.

Haam Sui Gok
Haam Sui Gok

[Photographs: J. Kenji Lopez-Alt]

Deep fried dumplings made from glutinous rice dough. They come out blistered and crispy with a chewy, lightly doughy layer underneath the crispness. Fillings range from pork and sausage to coconut or sweet bean paste.

Jiu Cai Bau
Jiu Cai Bau

[Photograph: Robyn Lee]

Wheat starch skin dumplings stuffed with chives that are subsequently pan-fried to give them a crisp crust.

Sheng Jian Bao
Sheng Jian Bao

[Photograph: Liz Bomze]

A fried bun-like dumpling made with a very thick skin, cooked in large cast iron pans so that the bottoms crisp up and fry while the tops delicately steam. Like xiaolongbao, they have juicy, pork-filled centers.

Siu Mai
Siu Mai

[Photographs: Robyn Lee]

Open-topped steamed pork and/or shrimp dumplings made with a wheat flour wrapper, they often come topped with fish roe or grated carrot, or occasionally a single pea.

Wu Gok
Wu Gok

[Photograph: Robyn Lee]

Crispy, wispy, slightly sweet fried purple taro surrounding a center of savory pork filling, wu gok are a study in contrasts.

Tang Yuan
Tang Yuan

[Photograph: Robyn Lee]

Sweet glutinous rice dumplings that are often filled with rock candy, sesame paste, peanuts, or bean paste. They can be served on their own or in a sweet bean, sesame, or ginger soup.

Gyoza (Japan)
Gyoza (Japan)

[Photograph: J. Kenji Lopez-Alt]

The Japanese version of guo tie, featuring a much thinner skin and a pork-based filling often flavored with garlic. They're serve pan-fried at ramen shops and Chinese restaurants. The best shops will pan fry them in specially-made cast iron pans, first steaming them with water. The washed off starches from the dumplings form a lacy crust on the bottom of the ban that can be carefully lifted, fusing the dumplings into one solid piece that remains crisp as you eat it.

Mandu (Korea)
Mandu (Korea)

[Photograph: J. Kenji Lopez-Alt]

A wide variety of dumplings fall under this umbrella. Mulmandu are boiled stuffed dumplings, while jjinmandu are steamed dumplings. Gunmandu are pan fried. They can be filled with anything from pork or beef to kimchi or fish.

Thai-style Dumplings
Thai-style Dumplings

[Photograph: J. Kenji Lopez-Alt]

Made with fresh steamed rice noodles and sprinkled with sweet fried shallots, these dumplings closely resemble Vietnamese-style Bánh Cuốn.

Samosa (India)
Samosa (India)

[Photograph: Joe Roy]

Savory dumplings that are deep fried or pan fried with a filling of vegetables, potato, or lamb, often heavily spiced and served with chutneys.

Gujia (India)
Gujia (India)

[Photograph: Ayeesha Riaz via tasteofpearlcity.blogstpot.in]

Crescent shaped dumplings stuffed with a sweet mixture of fruits and coconut, deep fried until crisp.

Pierogi (Poland)
Pierogi (Poland)

[Photograph: Shanon Lacy via The Curvy Carrot]

Boiled-then-fried (or baked) wheat flour dumplings stuffed with potato, sauerkraut, meat, or fruit. They're made into crescent shapes and pan-fried flat.

Vareniki (Ukraine)
Vareniki (Ukraine)

[Photograph: Leela Punyaratabandhu via shesimmer.com]

The Ukrainian version of pierogi are commonly stuffed with sauerkraut, cheese, potatoes, and meat, or can be served sweet with fruits and cheese. They're cooked by boiling or steaming and served with oil or butter.

Pelmeni (Russia)
Pelmeni (Russia)

[Photograph: Robyn Lee]

Wheat-based dumpling with a havily spiced filling (black pepper and other Eastern European spices), usually stuffed with strongly seasoned meat—Beef, pork, or mutton or common choices. It originates from Siberian cuisine, via China.

Khinkali (Georgia)
Khinkali (Georgia)

[Photographs: Robyn Lee]

A large dumpling resembling a xiaolongbao filled with spiced meat that releases juices as it cooks. It's commonly served with freshly ground black pepper.

Manti (Armenia)
Manti (Armenia)

[Photograph: Jessica Leibowitz]

Most often stuffed with spiced lamb, Armeniian manti can come served in a spiced, tomatoey sauce along with yogurt and middle eastern spices like pepper and sumac.

Dumpling the dog (Harlem)
Dumpling the dog (Harlem)
The tastiest dumpling around.*

*no longer available.

Carimañolas (Colombia)
Carimañolas (Colombia)

[Photographs: J. Kenji Lopez-Alt]

Dumplings stuffed with meat or cheese with a wrapper made from cooked yucca dough. They are deep fried until crisp.

Stuffed pasta (Italy)
Stuffed pasta (Italy)

[Photograph: Sara Remington]

Ravioli, tortellini, and other stuffed pastas all fit our basic definition of stuffed dumplings. Thin dough wrapper around a filling, in this case most commonly meat, cheese, or cooked vegetables, though it can really be anything. Gnocchi are technically dumplings, but we're not including simple boiled or steamed dough variants in our guide.
Burgerogi (America)
Burgerogi (America)
[Photograph: Grand Appetite] This is what happens when you combine a hamburger with a pierogi.