Slideshow: 11 Asian Noodle Dishes You Should Know

Japchae from Korea
Japchae from Korea
Japchae is made by stir-frying delicate sweet potato noodles in sesame oil. This Korean dish also features a mix of julienned carrots, sliced green onions, spinach, mushrooms and on occasion, beef. It is flavored with soy sauce and topped off with sesame seeds and chili pepper slices.

Pictured here is Jap Chae from IL Bun Ji in Canada.

Tsukemen Ramen from Japan
Tsukemen Ramen from Japan
You've had the instant stuff and the noodles swimming in salty, meaty broth. Here’s another ramen style to try: Tsukemen. Roughly translated, it means “dipping noodles”. Eat this Japanese noodle dish by dipping the cold Chinese-style wheat noodles into a side of hot broth. It is garnished with soft boiled egg, pork, green onions and more.

Pictured here is Tsukemen from Minca in New York City.

Laksa from Malaysia and Singapore
Laksa from Malaysia and Singapore
Laksa is a spicy noodle soup that has a couple varieties. The main two types: curry laksa, which uses a coconut curry broth base, and asam laksa, which has fish, other seafood and a tangy tamarind kick. You may also find bean curd puffs, bean sprouts, shrimp, cockles, chicken or even congealed pork blood in your bowl of laksa.

Pictured here is Penang Assam Laksa from Jinjang Selatan in Malaysia.

Batchoy from the Phillipines
Batchoy from the Phillipines
Batchoy is frequently compared to Japanese Ramen. Sprinkled with pork cracklings, the noodles are in a savory shrimp broth and might be topped with beef, chicken, garlic, and green onions.

Pictured here is in the Philippines.

Banmian from China
Banmian from China
Originally from China, Banmian is a simple soup of handcut egg noodles and fish stock. It often contains vegetables like green onions, mushrooms, and spinach and can be topped with crunchy anchovies. Sometimes this noodle soup will come with a raw egg on the side, which should be dropped into the hot liquid to cook.

Pictured here is Dumpling Ban Mian from The Basement by Kopitiam in Singapore.

Saimin from Hawaii
Saimin from Hawaii
Though part of the United States, Hawaii's food has been greatly influenced by many Asian cultures. Elements of Japanese, Chinese, and Filipino cuisine have contributed to the creation of this Hawaiian noodle dish, Saimin. When ordering, look for a combination of pot stickers, wontons, green onions, char siu, sausage or even Spam over noodles in broth.

Pictured here is Won Ton Min from Hamura Saimin Stand in Hawaii.

Phad Thai from Thailand
Phad Thai from Thailand
Phad Thai can mean stir-fried rice noodles with a tamarind and fish sauce base, bits of scrambled egg, tofu, shrimp, roasted peanuts, bean sprouts, cilantro and a lime wedge. But did you know it can also be made with translucent cellophane noodles?

Pictured here is Phad Thai from Tham Chiang Dao in Thailand.

Banh Canh from Vietnam
Banh Canh from Vietnam
Vietnamese Banh Canh might look like udon, but it’s not. The thick, chewy noodles are actually made from rice flour and either tapioca or wheat flour. Combine the noodles with crab meat and seafood broth to enjoy Banh Canh Cua. It can also be made with different combinations of pork, shrimp, and fish.

Pictured here is Banh Canh Cua from 56 A Tran Binh Trong in Vietnam.