Slideshow: Snapshots from El Salvador: Best Things We Ate in Juayúa

Juayúa Market
Juayúa Market
Juayúa’s Saturday and Sunday gastronomic festival attracts both locals and tourists. It stretches through the regular covered market, seen here, and the streets surrounding the central plaza.
Cojutepeque sausage
Cojutepeque sausage
A meat necklace! Located in El Salvador’s center, the city of Cojutepeque exports its sausage throughout the country. Tied with corn husks, they mix beef and pork, and were some of the most memorable bites we had.
Botin
Botin
This hunk of apple pastry cost us one US dollar. (In 2001, El Salvador adopted US currency in an effort to help stabilize the economy and encourage foreign investment.) We would gladly have done our part for dollarization by paying even more for this concentrated mass of baked goodness.
Pupusas
Pupusas
The quintessential Salvadoran dish. Every pupusa begins a ball of masa de maíz dough. You dig a hole with your fingers and fill it with beans, queso, or chicharrón (ground pork, not pork rinds or skin, as elsewhere). Swoop the dough back over the hole. After pinching off the excess, flatten the ball against your palms. Pat-pat-pat. Pat-pat-pat, as metronomic as ironic clapping, and as saliva-inducing as Pavlov’s bell. At only $0.25 each, it was hard to eat just ten.
Pupusa
Pupusa
We topped our pupusas with curtido, the ubiquitous pickled cabbage relish that gives a bite to the otherwise mild disk.
Tamarindos
Tamarindos
These sugar-covered, incredibly sour balls reminded us of punishment. As we popped one into our mouth, we were immediately cast back to a childhood incident involving swear words and a bar of soap. Native to Africa, the tamarind tree now grows in Central America, and its fruit can be used to make ice cream, drinks, jams, sauces, or candy. It can also be used as furniture polish and, in our case anyway, an aide-mémoire.
Torta guanaca
Torta guanaca
This torta guanaca demonstrates the pleasures of sloppy sandwiches: the lettuce slipping around the cold cuts (here, ham), thanks to several smears of ketchup, mayo, and hot sauce, the baguette pressed flat by the heel of an experienced hand. One napkin was definitely not enough.
Riguas
Riguas
Technically, riguas are grilled corn cakes. Experientially, they’re more like cornmeal pancakes. Ours had shreds of coconut, so no dipping sauce or syrup was required. We ate the airy, squeaky cheese first, then luxuriated in every chewy bite of rigua.
Camarones con carne
Camarones con carne
This mammoth plate of food was one of the hottest sellers of the day. The meat added fat to the shrimp, the real stars of this show. They were light and buttery and expertly grilled. “Oh,” we said as we ate. “Oh oh oh oh oh oh.”
Tortilla sandwiches
Tortilla sandwiches
When asked what these were called, the women selling them said “creyos.” Unfortunately, we can’t find a similar word in our dictionaries, in our guidebooks, or on Google. So, we’ll call them “tortilla sandwiches.” Unlike traditional pupusas, these tortillas don’t have any filling, and they’re served stacked atop one another, with melted cheese acting as mortar.
Pumia
Pumia
These meringues immediately evidenced their ingredients: sugar, butter, eggs, and coffee. On the tongue, they dissolved almost instantly.
Iguana (garrobo) and iguana eggs
Iguana (garrobo) and iguana eggs
We’re not going to lie to you: iguana does taste like chicken. But this particular iguana got dunked in a peppery sauce made from pepitas known as alguashte, giving it a liveliness the meat on its own would lack. The eggs, on the other hand, tasted like a mucus-filled water balloon. If you're an Andrew Zimmern fan, you might think you should try iguana eggs someday. You are mistaken.
Minutas
Minutas
Because orange Fantas are only so hydrating, and because bottled water is bad for the environment, we refreshed ourselves often with minutas, shaved ice flavored with syrup and topped with condensed milk and fruit. The pink is sandía (watermelon), the orange is melón (cantaloupe), and the best is when the ice has melted into a saccharine, slushy soup.
Piragüero
Piragüero
A man with ice on a hot day will never lack for friends. OK, so that’s not an actual proverb, but the sentiment still stands, especially when the man’s wheeled cart also includes lots of flavored syrups and chopped fruit.
Piragua with honey and apples
Piragua with honey and apples
Our piragua had honey, apples, cherry and orange flavoring, and the distinctive cylindrical shape of hand-shaved, hand-funneled ice. Worth a plane ride.