Slideshow: 23 Pickle Recipes We Love

Garlic Dill Pickles
Garlic Dill Pickles
If you've never canned before, you can make it easier on yourself and make them as refrigerator pickles. (We've also included the canning instructions.) Get the recipe »

[Photograph: Marisa McClellan]

Pickled Garlic
Pickled Garlic
Use pickled garlic in salad dressings or as part of a pickle plate. They're particularly good when drizzled with a bit of fruity oil. During dinner prep, I'll often coarsely chop the pickled cloves and add them to sautéed vegetables, as they add both flavor and add an acidic punch to the finished dish. Get the recipe
Sweet & Spicy Pickle Relish
Sweet & Spicy Pickle Relish
And then there's relish. True, it's good on hot dogs, but this condiment can do so much more. I think it's time to shake off the lowbrow reputation that pickle relish has been saddled with for so long and bring out into the limelight. Since it's essentially a chopped pickle, you can use it anywhere that a bit of sliced or minced dill pickle might go. Spread it on a sandwich, stir it into tuna or chicken salad, or even put it out on a cheese tray along with a dish of tapenade. Get the recipe
Red Beet Eggs
Red Beet Eggs
The finished eggs are bright in both color and flavor. Pickling firms the whites of the hard boiled egg, transforming them into something tangy and substantial. The finished eggs are good eaten on their own, or chopped into a vibrantly colored salad and make a terrific addition to any springtime table. Get the recipe
Quick Pickled Fennel with Orange
Quick Pickled Fennel with Orange
The fennel is sliced thinly, tossed with some salt and allowed to sit for an hour or so. This salting step draws out some of the liquid and makes space for the vinegar to enter the fennel. The finished product is half salad, half pickle and all flavorful crunch. Get the recipe
Bubbling Pickled Oysters
Bubbling Pickled Oysters
These pickles are a great success. I ate them as Charlotte suggests, removing the mushrooms from the brine a bit before serving and drizzling them with good olive oil to balance the tartness of the vinegar. I can also imagine adding them to a salad of hearty wheatberries, goat cheese, and torn arugula. Get the recipe
Fava Beans
Fava Beans
Fava beans are sweet, tender, and pleasantly starchy. When they're coated with a slick of olive oil, vinegar and garlic bits, the contrast between the sharp dressing and the mild greenness of the beans is really wonderful. Get the recipe
Pickled Brussel Sprouts
Pickled Brussel Sprouts
It includes garlic, bay leaves, peppercorns and mustard seeds. They're wonderfully zingy. Get the Recipe
Marinated Carrots with Mint
Marinated Carrots with Mint
This recipe is essentially my riff on the marinated carrot salad you so often find on the pickle bar at falafel joints. I've streamlined the ingredients a little, to keep it easy and pantry-friendly, and whenever I make it, the bowl or jar empties fast. I like to eat them out of the jar with a fork for lunch, or put them out on a buffet of cold salads. Get the recipe
Pickled Eggplant with Mint and Garlic
Pickled Eggplant with Mint and Garlic
The pickle was zippy and bright with flavor. The texture was tender without any sign of mushiness. Dressed with drizzle of olive oil and served with a few hunks of feta and a some bread will make for an instant appetizer. Get the recipe
Spicy Dilly Beans
Spicy Dilly Beans
Dilly beans are green beans, suspended in a vinegar-based pickling liquid and seasoned simply with garlic, black peppercorns and either dill heads or seeds. Because beans are sturdy little suckers, they retain their crispness through the boiling water bath process. Even months after canning, dilly beans will be crunchy and intensely flavorful.Get the recipe
Pickled Seckel Pears
Pickled Seckel Pears
Seckel pears have long been a favorite of home food preservers. Because of their size, they can be packed into jars whole, eliminating the work of peeling and chopping. They also work both as a sweet preserve, packed in simple syrup and as a tangy one, covered with a slightly sweetened vinegar brine. Get the recipe
Pickled Red Tomatoes
Pickled Red Tomatoes
Squeeze these pickled tomatoes into bits over homemade pizza dough, cut them into strips to eat with cheese or simmer them down with a bit of their brine into a quick topper for baguette toasts. Get the recipe
Pickled Chinese Long Beans
Pickled Chinese Long Beans
To help make these pickles a wholly different thing from standard pickled green bean, I skipped the traditional dill seed and opted for warmer spices like star anise, bay leaf, and red pepper flake. The finished product is everything I'd hoped—crunchy, deeply tart and so fun to eat. Get the recipe
Sweet Pickled Daikon Radish
Sweet Pickled Daikon Radish
This particular pickle is built to mimic the flavors of the carrot and daikon pickle that you find served as a tart garnish alongside spring rolls and lettuce wraps at Vietnamese restaurants. The different is that this one has been designed to be safe for boiling water bath canning. It's a bit stronger in the vinegar department but lacks none of the flavor. Get the recipe
Pickled Cranberries
Pickled Cranberries
Like so many cranberry concoctions, this one is so, so good with turkey (better with dark meat than light in my opinion). It's also a marvel with ham. And should your family have a Thanksgiving chopped liver tradition, this little sweet and sour pickle goes a long way with a smear of that fatty pate Get the recipe
Pickled Asparagus
Pickled Asparagus
Use the freshest asparagus you can find for these pickles. Older asparagus shrivels a great deal during processing. It happens to some extent with every batch, but the fresher the stalks, the plumper they remain. Get the Recipe
Pickled Red Grapes
Pickled Red Grapes
These pickled grapes are a sweet pickle. The sugar balances out the astringency of the vinegar and leaves you with edgy burst of sweet-tart flavor. Get the Recipe