Slideshow: 13 Classic British Foods We Love

Chicken Tikka Masala
Chicken Tikka Masala
When done right, the sauce should be a multifaceted affair; a balanced blend of intense spice flavors with a gingery kick rounded off by the richness of cream and butter, with a splash of freshness and acid from tomatoes and citrus. As you bite into a chunk of chicken, the smokey char should work its way though to the forefront, to be slowly replaced by a new layer of spicing, this time intensified by its time on the grill. The chicken chunks should be juicy, moist, and tender.Get the Recipe>>
Scotch Eggs
Scotch Eggs
There's nothing new about the combination of sausage and eggs, but sometimes it's good to go with what works. In concept, scotch eggs are incredibly simple—an egg wrapped in sausage then breaded and deep-fried. Get the Recipe >>
Onion Bahji
Onion Bahji
After a long night at the pub, nothing sets you straight like a bowl of piping hot curry and a big plate of crisp onion bahji. Available at most curry shops in the UK, these simple fritters are the ideal mix of salt, spices, and fat that can put you quickly back on track after a few too many pints. These fritters are a great example of Anglo-Indian food and are basically a hybrid of a pakora and an onion ring. Get the recipe >>
Kedgeree
Kedgeree
Rice, curry, smoked haddock, and eggs—at first glance these ingredients seem a tad odd, but if you've ever had a steaming plate of kedgeree, you know that it all comes together like a poem in your mouth. This dish derives from the Indian influence on British cuisine. A few big scoops of curry powder are incorporated with some classic British ingredients to make a dish that is exciting and somehow soothing at the same time. This jumbled dish is most often served as breakfast. Get the recipe here >>
Chelsea Buns
Chelsea Buns
Sharing the same name as a famed London neighborhood, these buns are glazed with sugary icing while they're still warm to make them especially sweet. They are like a cinnamon bun but have a less gooey, more sticky property. If you have less of a sweet tooth, simply disregard the final step of icing them—they will still be sweet, just less tacky. Chelsea buns are great at any time of day, but they really shine as a mid-morning snack. The sweetness will easily get you to lunch, but they're not too heavy. To counter the sweetness a nice hot mug of strong tea is ideal—a good quality Earl Grey would be great, but even a strongly steeped PG Tips could do the trick. Get the recipe >>
Bacon Butty
Bacon Butty
This classic sandwich couldn't be easier to make. The only ingredients are a pound of bacon and some crusty rolls, but the addition of HP sauce, a British staple, makes the sum more than its parts. For those who were not raised with HP sauce, its flavor is savory and acidic, sweet and salty, and many of us consider it one of the world's great meat condiments. Get the recipe >>
Steak Kidney Pie
Steak Kidney Pie
The smell of this pie cooking will envelope your kitchen with smells that make you feel like you've just gotten in from hunting pheasant (or maybe fox), and like you're looking forward a glass of port while you wait for your supper to be served. Get the recipe >>
Roast Beef and Yorkshire Pudding
Roast Beef and Yorkshire Pudding
Yorkshire Pudding is made from batter and usually served with a roast and gravy. Frying a few slices of bacon will give you enough fat to cook your Yorkshires, as well as a much-deserved snack for the cook. Get the recipe >>
Bacon-Wrapped Toads in a Leek-Filled Hole
Bacon-Wrapped Toads in a Leek-Filled Hole
This traditional British dish is normally served with brown onion gravy, but a runny fried egg on top does far better at breakfast. Wrapping the case-less sausage in bacon and then browning the leeks provides a delicious fatty base for the batter to cook in, and helps to get the ideal puffiness that makes this dish great. Get the recipe >>
Lemon Cardamom Syllabub
Lemon Cardamom Syllabub
On the list of great culinary innovations that Britain has given the world, desserts would be at the top. Although trifle and pudding are the most well-known, the humble syllabub is my personal favorite. What comes down to a flavored whipped cream is made more complex by the slight curdle the cream gets from citrus, and the sweet alcohol burn given to the cream by sugar and brandy. Get the recipe >>