Slideshow: Nagi Golden Gai in Tokyo: Something Fishy About the Ramen (In A Good Way)

Nagi Golden Gai, By Day and By Night
Nagi Golden Gai, By Day and By Night
Night is especially intriguing in historic Golden Gai, with its alleys full of tiny bars. Ramen is perfect after a night of drinking.

Nagi Golden Gai is open daily from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. (lunch is non-smoking), and then 6 p.m. until 5 a.m., except Sunday nights, when it closes "early" at 2 a.m. (It's completely closed the third Sunday night of each month.)

Entry Steps and Ticket Machine
Entry Steps and Ticket Machine
Nagi Golden Gai is on the second floor, so you need to ascend the steep steps to the ticket machine. Choose your ramen, sides, and drinks, then pay and get your tickets. You'll have to go back down the steps and wait outside until they call you through the black tube (seen in the previous photo).
A Seat at the Counter
A Seat at the Counter
When you're called back up, you'll get one of the ten counter seats. If you understand Japanese, there's all kinds of information about the food that you can read. On the counter you'll find everything you need for your meal, including chopsticks, water, soy sauce, vinegar, spice powder, and toothpicks. Ask and you can get sansho rayu. This chili oil, spiked with numbing and earthy sansho peppercorns, will be a good complement to the bitter ramen broth.
Noodles are a Weighty Matter
Noodles are a Weighty Matter
One of the chefs measures out a noodle order on the scale. If you order regular ramen (soup), you'll get 200 grams of noodles. But if you want tsukemen (noodles that you dip in broth that's served lukewarm on the side), the ticket machine will show options of 300 or 400 grams for the same price. Choose what you like, though note that women may be asked if they prefer a more dainty 200 grams. And if that's that not enough noodles, heavyweight ramen eaters can order more: large (+100 grams) or extra-large (+200 grams).
It's All About the Broth
It's All About the Broth
Nagi Golden Gai is all about the niboshi broth. (In fact, a sign outside says "If you don't like niboshi, please don't come in.") Niboshi are dried baby sardines, and they combine with chicken to make a bitter but delicious shoyu (soy sauce) broth. Niboshi is what makes this restaurant unique.
Eggs and More
Eggs and More
Next to the scale is a big bowl full of perfectly cooked eggs. Behind, the chef prepares an order. The wall describes how the ramen is made and gives information about how to best enjoy the ramen.
Tsukemen, with an Egg
Tsukemen, with an Egg
Here is an order of tsukemen, with an egg (900 yen, or about $11.20). I ordered 400 grams. Note that, as with their hot ramen, there are actually two types of noodles. In addition to the thick round noodles, there's a small portion of wide, tagliatelle-type noodles that are starting to approach the size of lasagna sheets. Behind is the niboshi dipping sauce, which contains cubes of pork.
Nagi Golden Gai Interior
Nagi Golden Gai Interior
Here's a look at the interior of the restaurant. Seating is right across from the chefs, and especially when it's full (this was a rare moment with some empty seats), it gets warm inside. With boxes and other items in every conceivable space, it's quite a cozy restaurant.
Empty Bowl
Empty Bowl
Given all the noodles, I can't believe I ate the whole thing. And why not? You won't find this type of ramen in America.