Slideshow: Making Two-Ingredient Cream Biscuits, with Nathalie Dupree and Cynthia Graubart

Nathalie and Cynthia
Nathalie and Cynthia
The ladies of biscuit-making, with their awesome cookbook.
Use a Wide Bowl
Use a Wide Bowl
Cynthia models the ideal biscuit-making bowl: wide and shallow, so that "no one part of the dough gets overworked."
Self-Rising Flour
Self-Rising Flour
These biscuits depend on self-rising flour, "preferably Southern," made of soft winter wheat. "Don't get all Northern—all King Arthur."

"Those are good for bread, but they're too high protein for biscuits—when you slap it around it punches you back. We want something more tender down in the South. We're delicate."

Whipping Cream
Whipping Cream
"Y'all might not know that cream makes butter," Dupree jokes. Whipping cream is the second ingredient; the biscuits require 2 parts self-rising flour to 1 part whipping cream.
Make a Hollow
Make a Hollow
"Not a well!" says Graubart. "Wells go all the way down. Just brush out a little hollow to pour your cream into." Her other helpful tip as the flour started flying: "Don't make biscuits in black." She was, of course, wearing black.
Stir
Stir
Stir the dough around the outside of the bowl just until incorporated—as little as possible.
Pat It Down
Pat It Down
"Pat the dough, don't fondle it! And don't knead it—take 'knead' out of your vocabulary." Dupree carefully pats the wet dough into something like a rectangle.
Fold
Fold
Then fold the whole sheet over so that the still-pretty-wet biscuit dough folds over on top of itself, in half...
... like so...
... like so...
Measure
Measure
A ruler will tell you when you're done patting: 1/2" for baby biscuits (which Dupree and Graubart prefer), 3/4" for slightly bigger, 1" for "those gigantic things you see all the time these days, the ones you could drive a truck through."
Cut and Punch
Cut and Punch
"Always start on the outside, so that the excess dough moves to the center," says Dupree. And when you have leftover scraps, "layer them, don't scrunch them"—that is, don't smush them all up into a ball, but carefully stack them in layers and then pat together with more flour.
Baked!
Baked!
For these little guys, bake for 12-ish minutes at a 475° oven: bake for 6 minutes, rotate the pan, then check back after an additional 4 minutes or so to check if they're golden brown on top. Take 'em out, brush with butter (fine, that's a third ingredient, but it's optional) and you're good to go.