Slideshow: Foie-lapalooza: 5 Ways to Eat Foie Gras in Montreal

Foie Gras Double Down (Joe Beef)
Foie Gras Double Down (Joe Beef)
Two thick slabs of foie gras are breaded with crumbled potato chips and deep-fried. Sandwiched between them are bacon, aged cheddar, and housemade aioli. On top? An altogether gratuitous drizzle of maple syrup. The combination is immensely flavorful, and actually much less of a gut-bomb than you might expect.
Cromesquis de Foie Gras (Au Pied de Cochon)
Cromesquis de Foie Gras (Au Pied de Cochon)
Molten hot liver with a crispy exterior. What could be wrong with that? Surprisingly, this might be the lightest of the snacks available at this famously fat-loving Montreal institution. The interior is almost liquid, though, so beware. Best enjoyed with a glass of bubbly Québécois cider.
PDC farci au foie gras (Au Pied de Cochon)
PDC farci au foie gras (Au Pied de Cochon)
Make no mistake, this thing is as big as a sumo wrestler's forearm. An entire pork trotter has been deboned, stuffed with foie gras and mushrooms, and cooked until crispy and golden. It sits on a (king-size) bed of mashed potatoes, and gets drowned in a thick gravy of caramelized onions, tomato, and yet more mushrooms. A bonus piece of seared foie gras on top, and this insurmountable beast is complete.
Foie Gras Pain Perdu, Dulce de Leche, Cerises de Terre et Cannelle (Bouillon Bilk)
Foie Gras Pain Perdu, Dulce de Leche, Cerises de Terre et Cannelle (Bouillon Bilk)
It starts simply and satisfyingly enough: a thick wedge of French toast, moist on the inside and caramelized on the outside. Dulce de leche ice cream and a sweet-tart ground cherry confiture keep it company. And finally there's the foie gras — seared and salty, the perfect crown for this kingly creation.