Slideshow: Snapshots from Jamaica: Jerk Chicken and Pork at Scotchies

Allspice tree
Allspice tree
On the island, jerk meats are cooked with wood from the allspice tree, native to the Carribean, and parts of Mexico and South America.
Cooking on wood
Cooking on wood
The pork and chicken are cooked over slats of wood, covered on top with metal sheeting. Chicken takes around an hour, pork around three hours.
Everything but the head
Everything but the head
Their pork comes in halves weighing around forty pounds each, tails and trotters included. The only part that wasn't splayed out on the wood was the head.
Cooking in oil cans
Cooking in oil cans
In the oil cans the heat source is hot and fast. Meat and fish are cooked directly over the coals on the grate, not indirectly on the edges of the grate.
Crispy skin
Crispy skin
Topside, the skin crisps up nicely while the meat inside remains tender.
Marinated chicken
Marinated chicken
This chicken may look wet now, but in under an hour the skin will be crispy. When I asked one of the grill guys what went into the marinade, he wouldn't even give me a hint. I wheedled out him: allspice, ginger, brown sugar, and scotch bonnet peppers, but there are other spices in the rub, to be certain. Black peppercorn, garlic, bay leaves, thyme, vinegar, and limes are common ingredients for the rub.
Jerk pork
Jerk pork
Even the lean pork was reasonably tender and juicy, though not as much as what came next....
Pork ribs
Pork ribs
Succulent ribs bursting with pork juice and fat.
Fish
Fish
A bonus, non-jerk item: Fish gently cooked in foil packets along with okra, tomatoes, bell peppers, and onions.
Fried bread
Fried bread
What better to accompany a meat extravaganza than something heavy and fried? Festival, the deep-fried crueller-like bread that's served with a lot of main courses on the island, is made with cornmeal dough that's sweet and grainy inside. The surface is fried so that it's thick and crunchy. (Think, hushpuppy, rather than beignet.)
Sweet potatoes
Sweet potatoes
Sweet potatoes came in thick slabs, perfectly roasted with a very dry, starchy "crumb." What's worse than a wet tuber, after all?
Spicy sauce
Spicy sauce
And, let's not forget the spicy sauce that I doused, dipped, and sipped with everything. Again, the sauce is made with scotch bonnet peppers, many of which have a heat rating of 100,000–350,000 Scoville units (Jalapeño peppers have a measly 2,500 to 8,000 units, by comparison). If you can tolerate the heat, you'll notice that the sauce actually had a lot vegetal sweetness to it as well.