20110918-171230-finished-stackers-post-size.jpg

[Photographs: Marisa McClellan]

Back in June, it didn't seem possible that the day would come when I'd be tired of fresh garden vegetables. However, as it happens every September, I've hit the wall. I cannot bear to look another summer squash in the face.

Though I don't have a garden of my own, between my CSA share and the generosity of friends, not a moment has gone by this season when I did not have some stripe of fresh squash in residence. I've eaten them steamed, roasted, grilled, fried, stewed, au gratin and cooked into a spreadable dip. We are well acquainted, squash and I.

20110918-171230-pattypan-squash-overhead.jpg

The breaking point came last week. Faced with yet another bag of squash (this time those tender UFO-shaped pattypans), I could not bring myself to steam and butter them (particularly since fingerling sweet potatoes are back!). Vinegar was my only option.

If you find yourself in similar squash straits, don't fret. Summer squash actually make wonderfully crisp and flavorful pickles that go really well on sandwiches or chopped and added to salads (julienned strips of these pickles are awfully good alongside autumnal dishes of roasted sausage and potato). You'll find that a single jar is never enough.

Before you Get Started

20110918-171230-pickling-spices-in-jar-2.jpg

These are refrigerator pickles because I wanted to keep things easy. If you're someone who is short on refrigerator space, you're welcome to pack them into smaller jars and run them through a boiling water bath canner for 10 minutes. See previous In a Pickle columns for more details.

20110918-171230-pouring-brine.jpg

Before you add these pickle slices to a sandwich, quickly blot them on a paper towel. Soaking up that extra liquid will keep your bread from getting soggy.

I like to use a mandoline slicer to get uniform slices. If you decide to use one, make sure to use the finger guard. Nothing takes the fun out of pickling like a little blood.

Get the recipe »

About the author: Marisa McClellan is a food writer, canning teacher, and dedicated pickler who lives in Center City Philadelphia. Find more of her jams, pickles and preserves (all cooked up in her 80-square-foot kitchen) at her blog, Food in Jars.

Comments

Comments can take up to a minute to appear - please be patient!

Previewing your comment: