Slideshow: SE Staff Picks: Our Favorite Non-Pedestrian Cheeses

Pop Tart Cat Cheese
Pop Tart Cat Cheese
My favorite lesser-known cheese is Pasteurized Prepared Pop Tart Cat Cheese Product by NYAN. You'll find hidden among the Pasteurized Prepared Cheese Product section of your local Asian grocery store. As the name implies, yes, it's made from the lactose-laced squeezings of a pop tart cat's mammary glands. (I don't know how they milk 'em, and I don't want to know.) The gooey cheese product features a swirl of colors and tastes like sweet rainbows. ...I mean, it's pretty damn sugary. I like it most on nachos or burgers. (A plus: The can plays music when you open it.) Robyn Lee
1983 Vintage Mozzarella
1983 Vintage Mozzarella
The one specific ball of mozzarella that Louis Di Palo himself of Di Palo Selects stretched for me back on September 17th, 1983. No other year, or exact date even, quite compares. Ed Levine
Alpaca Cheese
Alpaca Cheese
Plenty of factors affect the taste and quality of a cheese. The cheese-bearing creature's environment and diet, of course, but one vastly overlooked element is its fluffiness. There are direct links between voluminous fluff and extraordinary cheese production. So you can imagine how mouth-wateringly luscious and rich an alpaca cheese (especially from the fuzzball pictured here) would be. If you're in Peru, you might be able to track it down, but otherwise it's pretty rare. I've also heard great things about the panda cow's milk washed-rind cheese. Despite the animal's lack of a superfluously fluffy coat, it's supposed to be amazing. Definitely on the bucket list. Erin Zimmer
Coconut Cheese
Coconut Cheese
I'm sort of on a Malaysia kick these days; I wasn't going to blog about the cheese I had there, but I can't hold out on you guys. Off the east coast of the Malay peninsula, about 50 miles south of Pekan, there's a small island called Pulau Kelapa with a population of only about 1000. But they're locally famous for their coconut cheese, a local delicacy so fragile and perishable that it's never brought more than 10 miles away from where it's made. There's no ferry or bridge, and they don't look kindly on motorboats—their exhaust is a threat to the purity of the coconuts—so we had to row the three miles out there. I have to tell you that climbing the palm tree to pick those coconuts was one of the most incredible experiences of my life. I can't explain the cheesemaking process—I promised to honor their secrets, and they only told me off the record—but I can say that it's utterly unlike anything you've ever dreamt of. You just have to go there to understand. Carey Jones
28-Cereal-Bowl-Milk Cheese
28-Cereal-Bowl-Milk Cheese
This is the cheese for the cereal-obsessed. 28-bowl cheese is made in very small batches, hand crafted in a tiny village. The aged 47-bowl is more of a splurge. Really only for the holidays. Leandra Palermo
Cheese from the Oldest Pizzeria in the World
Cheese from the Oldest Pizzeria in the World
You probably read this week about the pizzerias duking it out for the title of "oldest pizzeria in America." Ha. Like I'd eat cheese from either of those places. I just don't stoop that low. My #1 all-time favorite cheese is from the oldest pizzeria anywhere. Any. Where. Made the year the opened. I'm not sure which pizzeria that would technically be, but when I find out, that will be my absolute favorite. Meredith Smith
Dashboard-Aged Gouda
Dashboard-Aged Gouda
I just hit the road on a cross-country road trip, San Francisco-bound. We're making a Southern loop from NYC, with stops in Delaware, the Carolinas, Alabama, New Orleans, Texas, and beyond. The main purpose of this journey was not to move out west but to age a wedge of gouda in the dashboard. (It's carefully bundled in maps, registration papers, and beef jerky wrappers.) All that gas money is going to very good use—every mile, I can almost taste this cheese getting better. By the time we make it to San Francisco, it'll have picked up so many flavors from so many terroirs. Try finding that in the refrigerated cheese section of a grocery store! You can't actually, and we're not sharing. Carrie Vasios
Odorless Cheese
Odorless Cheese
As expressed before, I'm not a fan of stinky cheeses. I'm always willing to pay a few extra bucks and travel a few extra miles for that out-of-the-way cheese shop that sells the rare, completely odorless variety. It's incredible what this high-tech odor-removal process can do these days. The machines strip out every possible whiff of anything remotely aromatic. What you're left with is an absolutely unscented, extremely artisanal cheese (like all of those pictured here). Some people don't even realize they're eating cheese! It's incredible. Christine Tsai