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[Photo via flickr: Howard Walfish, of Eat to Blog]

Turnips are vegetables that don't mind the cold at all. If turnips grew in temperatures over 80 degrees Fahrenheit, the turnips would mature too soon, becoming bitter and woody, according to the National Gardening Association. Available year-round in retail grocery stores, peak supplies of the root vegetable run from October to March. The roots are rich in vitamins A and C, while the greens have calcium and iron. The most well-used turnips are the purple-top white globes, but there are also the Tokyo cross hybrids and the Shogoin or Japanese turnips.

When choosing turnips, pick ones that feel heavy and firm, making sure the turnips still have moisture. Small turnips tend to taste sweeter and more tender compared to large ones. Turnips add heft to soups and a crunch to salads. Try using the vegetable in Serious Eats recipes like Moroccan-style braised vegetables and spring turnip salad.

Recipes

What are your favorite ways to eat turnips?

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