Gallery: Day of the Dead Treats: Pan de Muerto

Fresh baked
Fresh baked

Pan de muerto at Café El Popular.

Hot chocolate at El Popular
Hot chocolate at El Popular

Prepared with Oaxacan chocolate, it's intensely creamy and not hammer-blow-to-the-head chocolaty.

El Popular
El Popular

It's one of the oldest "cafés de chinos," or cafes established by Chinese immigrants, in Mexico City. It is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Zócalo
Zócalo

Part of the four-million peso "mega ofrenda" the city set up in the Zócalo, or central plaza.

Tree of death
Tree of death

"El árbol de la muerte florida." The flowery tree of death, the centerpiece of the mega ofrenda in the Zócalo.

Metro of Death
Metro of Death

This ghostly metro car is also part of the display in the Zócalo.

Ofrenda
Ofrenda

Part of a traditional ofrenda at the Archivo Histórico del Distrito Federal. Besides pan de muerto, the ofrenda includes guavas, limes, oranges, sugar skulls, a cigarette and cempasúchil flowers.

Candy skeletons
Candy skeletons

They crowd the churchyard in the display at Dulcería de Celaya, a traditional candy shop in downtown Mexico City.

Eternal Love
Eternal Love

The name of this particular sweet was "Amor Eterno," or eternal love.

Pall bearers
Pall bearers

More candy skeletons at Dulcería de Celaya.

Hmm
Hmm

The priests are beating their chests, the nuns are holding delicious cazuelas full of mole, but what are the skeletons holding skulls doing?

Dulcería de Celaya
Dulcería de Celaya

It was founded in 1874.

La Catrina
La Catrina

The elegant female representation of Death makes her way across a busy city street.

Cempasúchil
Cempasúchil

A field of cempasúchil flowers in the Zócalo.

Candles
Candles

Part of the ofrenda at the Universidad del Claustro de Sor Juana.

Tamales
Tamales

These ghoulish nuns at the Claustro Sor Juana have put together a pretty nice spread of tamales (both in banana leaf and corn husk wrappers), candy and fruit.

Floral Crowns
Floral Crowns

Nuns in colonial Mexico wore floral crowns on only two special occasions, the day they took their vows, and the day they died.

Over a block long
Over a block long

This is perhaps why the line was over a block long to get into the ofrenda at the Claustro: tamales, atole, pan de muerto, elotes, and many other treats.

20101029pan-de-muerto-main.jpg
20101029pan-de-muerto-main.jpg