Finally, a Heavy Metal Cookbook: 'Hellbent for Cooking'

"As someone who owned several Iron Maiden records before ever thinking about investing in a cast-iron skillet, I couldn't wait to get my hands on this."

20100126hellbentforcooking.jpgThere are a few guys who have rightly earned themselves the title of "culinary bad boy" in the past few years—ex-chef and travel show host Anthony Bourdain for his legendary snarkiness and propensity for drinking and smoking on air, Marco Pierre White for his legendary temper and exemplary cuisine, hot-headed Momofuku chef David Chang, king of the pork buns.

But these guys are nothing compared to the heavy metal home cooks who contributed the recipes for Annick Giroux's new cookbook Hellbent For Cooking.

As the editor and publisher of Morbid Tales, underground Canadian metal fanzine Giroux has two passions. The first is obviously heavy metal (in all of its forms) and the second, and more unlikely, is cooking.

Giroux decided to reach out to favorite bands and collect their recipes in cookbook form. The result is an international cookbook with some of the darkest and most creatively-named recipes around. As someone who owned several Iron Maiden records before ever thinking about investing in a cast-iron skillet, I couldn't wait to get my hands on Hellbent for Cooking.

With recipes contributed by dudes with names like King ov Hell from Norwegian black metal band Gorgoroth and Deathlord of Ambomination guitarist of Canada's Blasphemy one might assume that Hellbent for Cooking would be all bloody entrails and offal but surprisingly most of the recipes included are pretty tame, mostly regional dishes from the band's home country, the kind of meals they want to eat after the corpse paint has been scrubbed off and the gauntlets have been retired for the evening.

The recipes range from decidedly on-tour food meant to feed a crowd of hungry metal heads like Macaroni Against Monotheism, a combination of ground pork (666 grams to be exact), jarred pasta sauce and macaroni to regional to Fårikål, a traditional Norwegian dish from the infamous Mayhem, to Fried Egg Rigor Mortis Cure from Denmark's Denial of God.

These might not be recipes for the faint of heart but they are sure to please anyone out there who doesn't find it at all strange to be familiar with the world of Scandinavian black metal and own a copy of Larousse Gastronomique.

Comments

Add a comment

Comments can take up to a minute to appear - please be patient!

Previewing your comment: